Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Artificial selection for large and small relative brain size in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) results in differences in cognitive ability
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
2012 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Vertebrate brain size is remarkably variable at all taxonomic levels. Brains of mammals forexample, range from 0.1 gram in small bats (Chiroptera) to about 8-9 kilos in Sperm whales(Physeter macrocephalus). But what does this variation in size really mean? The link between brainsize and cognition is debated due to, for instance the difficulties of comparing cognitive ability indifferent species. A large number of comparative studies continue to provide information aboutcorrelations found both within and between species. The relative size of the brain is an example of apopular measurement that correlates with cognitive ability. But to date, no experimental studieshave yielded any proof causality between relative brain size and cognitive ability. Here I usedguppies selected for either large or small relative brain size to investigate differences in cognitiveperformance of a quantity discrimination task. The results from this experiment provideexperimental evidence that relative brain size is important for cognitive ability, and that a differencein cognitive ability could be obtained already after two generations of selection experiments onrelative brain size in a vertebrate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. , 15 p.
Keyword [en]
cognition, guppy, artificial selection, brain size
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-192953OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-192953DiVA: diva2:600822
Educational program
Bachelor Programme in Biology / Molecular Biology
Uppsok
Life Earth Science
Supervisors
Examiners
Projects
Artiļ¬cial Selection on Relative Brain Size in the Guppy Reveals Costs and benefits of Evolving a Larger Brain
Available from: 2013-01-26 Created: 2013-01-26 Last updated: 2013-01-26Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Artificial selection for large and small relative brain size in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) results in differences in cognitive ability(591 kB)171 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 591 kBChecksum SHA-512
e17e99036b6f684a41dedc99f0e952c57b9b8699672f3648b34ad4633e7ba892dc1175a9eeba8d4bbd2e4eeb0663b98bd104122ff87203af2233387029bb84b7
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bundsen, Andreas
By organisation
Biology Education CentreAnimal ecology
Evolutionary Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 171 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 519 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf