Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Seagrass Meadows in Chwaka Bay:Socio-ecological and Management Aspects
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Show others and affiliations
2012 (English)In: People, Nature and Research in Chwaka Bay / [ed] de la Torre-Castro M. and Lyimo T.J. (eds.), Zanzibar Town: WIOMSA , 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Zanzibar Town: WIOMSA , 2012.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-86755ISBN: 978-9987-9559-1-6 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-86755DiVA: diva2:589283
Note

The shallow-water seascape of Chwaka Bay consists of diverse habitats including coral reefs, sand/mud flats, algal belts and mangrove forests, but the embayment is primarily characterized by its widespread and highly productive seagrass beds. The Bay is a unique seagrass diversity “hotspot”, with eleven species observed, from small, fast-growing and thin-leaved “pioneer” species like Halophila ovalis and H. stipulacea to large, slower-growing “climax species” with thick and long leaves like Thalassodendron ciliatum and Enhalus acoroides. Consequently, it is not surprising that the small-scale subsistence fishery of Chwaka Bay can be seen as a seagrass fishery, with catches consisting primarily of species intimately associated with the seagrass meadows (de la Torre-Castro and Rönnbäck 2004; de la Torre-Castro 2006).Seagrasses are a polyphyletic group of marine vascular, rhizomal plants (den Hartog 1970, 12-13), which form stands of varying sizes usually called “beds” or “meadows” in intertidal and subtidal coastal waters across the globe. Seagrass meadows typically occur on nearshore soft bottoms (although some species are found on rocky bottoms) in single- or mixed-species assemblages, with the typical wide range from tropical to boreal margins of coastal waters (Green and Short 2003, 21-22). They form one of the most productive aquatic ecosystems on Earth (Duarte and Chiscano 1999) and in most areas occur intermixed with other large primary producers like macroalgae. Seagrass ecosystems support multiple ecological functions, including nursery grounds, food and refuge for many benthic,

Available from: 2013-01-17 Created: 2013-01-17 Last updated: 2013-01-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(4174 kB)421 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 4174 kBChecksum SHA-512
84919bdc4a04ff36af489ecbe8946962af8b4f9b1556743aba0bd075c1b71245939378d28f8cbfcc9fc4e37fba685d3bff86b4e371fcce4ae64719f44125acf6
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 421 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 349 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf