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Interaction design in a complex context: medical multi-disciplinary team meetings
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8200-2418
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
2012 (English)In: The 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, New York, NY, USA, 2012, 341-350 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In order to improve collaboration on, and visualisation of, patient information in medical multi-disciplinary team meetings, we have developed a system that presents information from different medical systems to be used as a support for the decision process. Based on field studies, we have implemented a high-fidelity prototype on tablet-sized displays, and tested it in a realistic setting. Our evaluation proved that more patient information can efficiently be displayed to all meeting participants, compared to the current situation. Interaction with the information, on the other hand, proved to be a complicated activity that needs careful design considerations; it should ultimately be based on what roles the meeting participants have, and what tasks they should complete. Medical decision-making is a complex area, and conducting interaction design in this area proved complex too. We foresee a great opportunity to improve medical work, by introducing collaborative tools and visualisation of medical data, but it requires that interaction design becomes a natural part of medical work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY, USA, 2012. 341-350 p.
National Category
Interaction Technologies Human Aspects of ICT Other Medical Engineering Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-108084DOI: 10.1145/2399016.2399070Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84871603873ISBN: 978-1-4503-1482-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-108084DiVA: diva2:578916
Conference
NordiCHI '12
Funder
Vinnova
Note

© ACM, 2012. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in The 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2399016.2399070

QC 20130110

Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2014-02-21Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Case-based presentation in medical multidisciplinary team meetings: Applied research in CSCW and IxD
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case-based presentation in medical multidisciplinary team meetings: Applied research in CSCW and IxD
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Advanced medical technology is widely used in modern healthcare, as more and more specialised examinations and treatments are performed on patients. In the case of particularly complex diseases, a number of medical specialists, each an expert in their own field, must collaboratively make diagnoses and plan for treatment. In multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTM), the medical specialists present their pieces of the puzzle, stitch them together and in consensus make a decision. A large amount of information from several sources must be taken into account, but the digital tools to support this decision-making are lacking.

This thesis describes research in which engineers and medical specialists have cooperatively developed such a tool. The main research question concerns improving patient information visualisation to support the collaborative work in MDTMs; a secondary question concerns the role of interaction design in medical work. Several design activities have been conducted together with the medical specialists by utilising research methods derived from computer- supported cooperative work (CSCW) and interaction design (IxD). The new tool has been evaluated in two simulated MDTMs and even though it was developed with the users, the results cut both ways.

Case-based presentation of patients in MDTMs has a positive effect, as more information can be displayed during discussions. It helps the participants keep a shared focus on the patient, her medical history, results from examinations, and decisions made in the meeting. It is a new and aggregated view of the patient and an example of how patient information visualisation can be improved. On the other hand introducing new technology and new ways of interacting with information, in the meetings was not considered entirely positive. The participants have different roles and tasks in the meeting, and the tools should support these without distracting the shared focus.

This practical way of working (conducting field studies, design activities and evaluations) together with ingenious medical specialists can make a difference. By exploring and concretising stakeholders’ needs and making long-term commitments, the interaction designer can take a central position in the deve- lopment of digital, collaborative tools for medical work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2013. viii, 77 p.
Series
Trita-CSC-A, ISSN 1653-5723 ; 2013:04
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-119810 (URN)978-91-7501-680-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-04-19, Kollegiesalen, Brinellvägen 8, KTH, Stockholm, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Vinnova
Note

QC 20130326

Available from: 2013-03-26 Created: 2013-03-22 Last updated: 2013-03-26Bibliographically approved
2. Mediated and Mobile Communication for Experts
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediated and Mobile Communication for Experts
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis focuses on systems for mediated communication that run on mobile technology. The aim has been to give an answer to the question about what require- ments there are for situation awareness for domain experts when communication is secondary and supports the primary task.

This thesis originated in a critical approach to the common practice of design- ing mediated communication systems with the face-to-face meeting as a guiding scenario. Instead, this thesis explores a design process that is based on the task and the strength of the technology itself. Different tasks do, of course, make different de- mands on a system, and a task that is strongly connected to the face-to-face meeting will probably be best served by a system that is designed from that perspective.

Three cases that are presented in this thesis share three common themes that have characteristics that set them apart from the face-to-face meeting. The first theme is that the communication is a secondary task that is used to support a primary task. The second theme is that the cases involve domain experts active in the primary task. The use of experts implies that communication will be task- centered and also that the need for information to sustain a valuable situation awareness may be different from a person with less experience in the domain. The third theme is that all cases and the corresponding tasks benefit from some kind of situation awareness among the participants for optimal execution of the task. The three cases are based on:

Wearable computers using mediated communication with wearable computers and how to handle interruptions for users of such computers

Multidisciplinary team meetings improving access to patient information and enabling individual and group interaction with this information

Trauma resuscitation giving a remote trauma expert’s correct and valuable in- formation while minimizing disturbance when supporting a local trauma re- suscitation team

Prototypes are central in all three cases, and different prototypes have been designed and evaluated to validate the benefit of designing tools for communication that do not try to replicate the face-to-face meeting.

The main findings in this thesis show that the shift of focus to the primary task when designing mediated communication systems has been beneficial in all three cases. A conflict between the secondary communication that is used to support sit- uation awareness and the primary task has been identified. Full situation awareness should therefore not be a goal in these designs but communication should support enough situation awareness to benefit the primary task with minimal disturbance to it. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. xiv, 63 p.
Series
TRITA-CSC-A, ISSN 1653-5723 ; 2014:01
Keyword
beyond being there, trauma, mediated communication, mdtm, wearable computers
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-141762 (URN)978-91-7595-043-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-03-14, Kollegiesalen, Brinellvägen 8, KTH, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20140221

Available from: 2014-02-21 Created: 2014-02-21 Last updated: 2014-02-21Bibliographically approved

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