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Metabolic factors and blood cancers among 578,000 adults in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
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2012 (English)In: Annals of Hematology, ISSN 0939-5555, E-ISSN 1432-0584, Vol. 91, no 10, 1519-1531 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated associations between metabolic factors and blood cancer subtypes. Data on body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglycerides from seven prospective cohorts were pooled (n = 578,700; mean age = 44 years). Relative risks of blood cancers were calculated from Cox regression models. During mean follow-up of 12 years, 2,751 incident and 1,070 fatal cases of blood cancers occurred. Overall, higher BMI was associated with an increased blood cancer risk. In gender-specific subgroup analyses, BMI was positively associated with blood cancer risk (p = 0.002), lymphoid neoplasms (p = 0.01), and Hodgkin's lymphoma (p = 0.02) in women. Further associations with BMI were found for high-grade B-cell lymphoma (p = 0.02) and chronic lymphatic leukemia in men (p = 0.05) and women (p = 0.01). Higher cholesterol levels were inversely associated with myeloid neoplasms in women (p = 0.01), particularly acute myeloid leukemia (p = 0.003), and glucose was positively associated with chronic myeloid leukemia in women (p = 0.03). In men, glucose was positively associated with risk of high-grade B-cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma, while cholesterol was inversely associated with low-grade B-cell lymphoma. The metabolic syndrome score was related to 48 % increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma among women. BMI showed up as the most consistent risk factor, particularly in women. A clear pattern was not found for other metabolic factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2012. Vol. 91, no 10, 1519-1531 p.
Keyword [en]
Cancer, Biomarker, Epidemiology, Leukemia, Lymphoma
National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-60050DOI: 10.1007/s00277-012-1489-zISI: 000308356900002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-60050DiVA: diva2:559635
Available from: 2012-10-10 Created: 2012-10-01 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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