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GPs decision-making - perceiving the patient as a person or a disease
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
Kalmar County Council, Sweden University of Tromso, Norway .
2012 (English)In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 13, no 38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical decision making strategies of GPs with regard to the whole range of problems encountered in everyday work. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A prospective questionnaire study was carried through, where 16 General practitioners in Sweden registered consecutively 378 problems in 366 patients. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: 68.3% of the problems were registered as somatic, 5.8% as psychosocial and 25.9% as both somatic and psychosocial. When the problem was characterised as somatic the main emphasis was most often on the symptoms only, and when the problem was psychosocial main emphasis was given to the person. Immediate, inductive, decision-making contrary to gradual, analytical, was used for about half of the problems. Immediate decision-making was less often used when problems were registered as both somatic and psychosocial and focus was on both the symptoms and the person. When immediate decision-making was used the GPs were significantly more often certain of their identification of the problem and significantly more satisfied with their consultation. Rules of thumb in consultations registered as somatic with emphasis on symptoms only did not include any reference to the individual patient. In consultations registered as psychosocial with emphasis on the person, rules of thumb often included reference to the patient as a known person. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The decision-making (immediate or gradual) registered by the GPs seemed to have been adjusted on the symptom or on the patient as a person. Our results indicate that the GPs seem to recognise immediately both problems and persons, hence the quintessence of the expert skill of the GP as developed through experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central , 2012. Vol. 13, no 38
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-82080DOI: 10.1186/1471-2296-13-38ISI: 000307939500001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-82080DiVA: diva2:557686
Note

Funding Agencies|Center for Clinical Research in Dalarna, Sweden||County Council of Norrbotten, Sweden||

Available from: 2012-09-28 Created: 2012-09-28 Last updated: 2017-12-07

Open Access in DiVA

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