Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Remnant echoes of the past: Archaeological geophysical prospection in Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this thesis has been to investigate the benefits, pitfalls and possibilities of using geophysical methods in archaeological projects. This is exemplified by surveys carried out at archaeological sites in different geographical and chronological contexts. The thesis also aims at investigating the cause for the under-use of the methods in Swedish archaeology by looking at previously conducted surveys. The methods used during these surveys have been Ground-penetrating radar (GPR), magnetometer, slingram and a kappameter. The surveys in the mountain tundra region of Lapland show that magnetic susceptibility surveys is a valuable aid in discovering heaps of fire-cracked stones and when combined with magnetometry, also hearths. GPR and magnetometer surveys within the Migration Period ringfort Sandbyborg provided the spatial layout of the fort and indicated, along with results from recent excavations and metal detections, many similarities with the ringfort Eketorp II. The non-magnetic character of the sedimentary bedrock on Öland and Gotland is suitable for magnetometer surveys and the method is also highly appropriate for the detection of the remains of high-temperature crafts. GPR surveys at St. Mary’s Dominican convent in Sigtuna produced the spatial layout of the central cloister area. The investigations also show that the geology, pedology, land use and the character of commonly occurring prehistoric remains in Sweden, in certain circumstances and in certain areas, have restricted the possibility of successfully carrying out geophysical surveys. Care must therefore be taken to choose the right instrument for the survey and to tailor the sampling density of each geophysical survey, according to the character and size of the expected archaeological remains, in order to maximize their information return. To increase the use of geophysical methods in Sweden the educational opportunities, both for surveyors and professional archaeologists, need to improve.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2012. , 116 p.
Series
Theses and papers in scientific archaeology, ISSN 1400-7835 ; 13
Keyword [en]
Archaeological prospection, geophysical survey, Sweden, Ground-penetrating radar, magnetometry, Slingram, magnetic susceptibility, Neolithic, Migration period, Viking Age, Middle Ages, Öland, Gotland, Sigtuna, Lapland
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeological Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-79239ISBN: 978-91-7447-549-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-79239DiVA: diva2:549188
Public defence
2012-10-12, sal G, Arrheniuslaboratorierna, Svante Arrhenius väg 20 C, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 2: Submitted. Paper 3: Manuscript.

Available from: 2012-09-20 Created: 2012-08-30 Last updated: 2012-09-26Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. A Review of the Use of Geophysical Archaeological Prospection in Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Review of the Use of Geophysical Archaeological Prospection in Sweden
2011 (English)In: Archaeological Prospection, ISSN 1075-2196, E-ISSN 1099-0763, Vol. 18, no 1, 43-56 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While geophysical prospection for iron ores has a long history in Sweden the use of geophysical archaeological prospection has been limited compared to other countries. In this paper we discuss the likely reasons for this situation and present a brief history of geophysical prospection and in particular geophysical archaeological prospection in Sweden. The first use of different prospection methods, such as metal detection, earth resistance, magnetic, ground-penetrating radar, seismic and electro-magnetic prospection in Swedish archaeology are presented. The archaeological Iron Age sites of Uppåkra and Birka have been subject to relatively intensive prospection activity and are therefore mentioned separately. An overview of the current situation of geophysical archaeological prospection and related issues is given, and pitfalls and possibilities are discussed. The paper finishes with an outlook on possible future developments.

Keyword
Geophysical prospection, review, history, Sweden, archaeological geophysics, Scandinavia
National Category
Archaeology Geophysics
Research subject
Archaeological Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-55100 (URN)10.1002/arp.401 (DOI)000287711100004 ()
Available from: 2011-03-01 Created: 2011-03-01 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
2. Archaeological Prospection of a High Altitude Neolithic Site in the Arctic Mountain Tundra Region of Northern Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeological Prospection of a High Altitude Neolithic Site in the Arctic Mountain Tundra Region of Northern Sweden
(English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

The project Arctic Sweden initiated during the International Polar Year (2007-2008) was aimed at investigating aspects of the natural and cultural environment in this area. During the summer of 2008 archaeological excavations and geophysical prospection surveys were carried out in the mountain tundra region of north-western Sweden. The investigations focused on locating settlement remains connected with a Middle Neolithic tool production site discovered by archaeologists in 2001. Magnetic susceptibility surveys using the MS2D system by Bartington Instruments and an EM38 by Geonics measuring the Inphase component of the electromagnetic field were used for the prospection of measureable traces of anthropogenic activity and structures such as hearths and middens within the estimated settlement area. Soil samples for phosphate analysis were also collected and analysed using a field analysis method developed by Merck. The magnetic susceptibility measurements successfully located a waste heap containing fire-cracked stones and refuse from a seasonal settlement. The results of the survey were confirmed by subsequent archaeological excavations, which also revealed a piece of resin with the imprint of a human tooth. One additional piece of resin dated the site to 3340 to 3100 BC. The soil phosphate analysis showed slightly increased values over the central part of the site and over the heap of fire-cracked stones, suggesting the applicability of the method to a mountain tundra environment. Comparison between the MS2D and EM38 measurements revealed a weak impact of the bedrock on the results, indicating a potential for the applicability of magnetic surveys to this specific type of environment. Future geophysical archaeological prospection in the Swedish mountain tundra region could benefit from a combined approach using high-resolution magnetometry and magnetic susceptibility measurements.

Keyword
Magnetic susceptibility, Phosphate, Sweden, Archaeological prospection, Stone Age, Geophysical survey
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeological Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-79237 (URN)
Available from: 2012-08-30 Created: 2012-08-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
3. A Room with a View: Archaeological Geophysical Prospection and Excavations at Sandby ringfort, Öland, Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Room with a View: Archaeological Geophysical Prospection and Excavations at Sandby ringfort, Öland, Sweden
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Archaeological investigations and clear aerial photographs have identified the presence of house foundations within several ring forts on the island of Öland, situated east of the Swedish mainland. One of them, Sandbyborg, was selected for further investigations by means of a ground-penetrating radar (GRP) and magnetometry survey. The purpose of the geophysical survey was to establish the fort’s spatial layout, to identify any internal constructions within the houses and to investigate whether the fort had multiple building phases. Targeted archaeological excavations was subsequently carried out to verify the validity of the geophysical results and to recover datable material that would enable the understanding of how Sandbyborg was chronologically related to the other ringforts of the island. This information could then be used to better understand the function of Sandbyborg. The results of the geophysical survey clearly show the presence of 36 or 37 stone foundations for houses situated radially aroundthe wall of the fort as well as 16 or 17 similar house foundations in a central building group. The geophysical results also provided information on the possible location of hearths, kilns and pits within the fort and also confirm the location of a third gate situated in the north-western part of the fort. The spatial layout and inner size of Sandbyborg is very similar to one of the other Migration Period ring forts on Öland, Eketorp II. However, there is no evidence of multiple building phases in the data from Sandbyborg. The subsequent excavations showed a very good correlation with the geophysical data. Datable finds, a 14C date from a human metatarsal found in one of the trenches and the lack of geophysical evidence of multiple building phases indicate that the ringfort was used for a limited period of time during thelate fourth century AD. Given the available evidence it is suggested that Sandbyborg primarily was used for military purposes or as a place of refuge intimes of unrest as its location in the outfields, far from arable lands, contradicts an interpretation of Sandbyborg as a fortified village, but as the evidence about the ringforts on Öland is restricted a continued use of geophysical prospection and excavations within the other forts is suggested as a means of obtaining a deeper understanding of the purpose and context of these highly interesting structures.

Keyword
Ringfort, Öland, geophysical survey, ground-penetrating radar, magnetometry
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeological Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-79236 (URN)
Available from: 2012-08-30 Created: 2012-08-30 Last updated: 2012-09-05Bibliographically approved
4. Tracing High-temperature Crafts: magnetometry on the Island of Gotland, Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tracing High-temperature Crafts: magnetometry on the Island of Gotland, Sweden
2012 (English)In: Archaeological Prospection, ISSN 1075-2196, E-ISSN 1099-0763, Vol. 19, no 3, 201-208 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gradiometer surveys have been carried at three Iron Age and early medieval sites on the island of Gotland, Sweden. Previous experiences of poorly executed magnetic surveys combined with a misconception among archaeologists that the Gotlandic sedimentary bedrock would preclude the success of any magnetic investigations on the island have, until now, prevented the extended use of the method within archaeological projects. The purpose of the present study was to test this presumption while searching for in situ buried remains of high-temperature crafts, such as metal and glass working. The location of the survey grids was guided by concentrations of previously recovered hightemperature craft finds from metal detector surveys and excavations. The results indicate that the magnetometer is a valuable tool for detecting the presence of preserved high-temperature craft structures in the Gotlandic soil. An additional result indicates that in this area the magnetometer can easily identify remains of ploughed-over Iron Age stone foundation houses and stone boundary walls. This is possible because of the prehistoric population’s preference of using glacially deposited, igneous rocks in such constructions. It can thus be concluded that the uniformly nonmagnetic character of the Gotlandic bedrock provides excellent conditions for conducting magnetic surveys.

Keyword
Magnetometry, metal detector, Gotland, Sweden, metal work, high-temperature crafts
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeological Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-79238 (URN)10.1002/arp.1428 (DOI)000308472900005 ()
Available from: 2012-08-30 Created: 2012-08-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
5. St. Mary's Dominican Convent in Sigtuna Revisited: Geophysical and archaeological investigations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>St. Mary's Dominican Convent in Sigtuna Revisited: Geophysical and archaeological investigations
2011 (English)In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 106, no 4, 322-333 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey and an archaeological excavation of the buried remains of the Medieval Dominican convent in Sigtuna (Raä 30) produced new information on the ground plan of the convent and the condition of the buried structures remaining at the site. The site has hitherto seen surprisingly little archaeological investigations, and it is now over 30 years since the previous fieldwork. In addition to the foundation walls of the convent and adjoining structures, GPR also revealed an earlier building phase and a previously unknown lavatorium connected to the southern range. These interpretations were confirmed by excavations in September 2009. A suggestion as to the function of the various buildings, based on comparison with other convents, is offered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2011
Keyword
Dominican Convent, GPR, Sigtuna, Excavation, Geophysical Prospection, Ground-penetrating Radar, Priory, Dominkanerkonvent, Georadar, Sigtuna, Utgrävning, Geofysisk prospektering
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeological Science; Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-68975 (URN)000300466000004 ()
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(19088 kB)2938 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 19088 kBChecksum SHA-512
f00bfd0b9d1663f50320d6d7c2a542937b576cd24d2b2db5a27679be59066246b2c171f7216b7a0c746b4e1f4a7c0e7962bbc1cd6bbd3d243c20c6a4d4de18fa
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Viberg, Andreas
By organisation
Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies
Archaeology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 2938 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 1068 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf