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Restless legs syndrome during and after pregnancy and its relation to snoring
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
2012 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no 7, 850-855 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To study development of restless legs syndrome (RLS) during and after pregnancy, and whether RLS is related to snoring or other pregnancy-related symptoms. Design. Prospective study. Setting. Antenatal care clinics in the catchment area of Linkoping university hospital, Sweden. Population. Five hundred consecutively recruited pregnant women. Methods. Sleep disturbances, including symptoms of RLS and snoring, were assessed with questionnaires in each trimester. A complementary questionnaire was sent three years after delivery to women experiencing symptoms of RLS during pregnancy. Main outcome measures. Symptoms of RLS in relation to snoring in each trimester. Results. Symptoms of RLS were reported by 17.0% of the women in the first trimester, by 27.1% in the second trimester and by 29.6% in the third trimester. Snoring in the first trimester was correlated to increased prevalence of RLS in all three trimesters (p= 0.003, 0.017 and 0.044 in the first, second and third trimester, respectively). No correlation was found between RLS and anemia, parity or body mass index. Among the women who experienced RLS, 31% still had symptoms three years after delivery. Fifty-eight per cent of those whose symptoms had disappeared stated that this happened within one month after delivery. Conclusions. Symptoms of RLS progressed most between the first and second trimester. Women who snored in the first or second trimester of pregnancy had a higher prevalence of RLS in the third trimester, which indicates that snoring in early pregnancy might predict RLS later. Symptoms of RLS disappear quite soon after delivery, but about one-third of women with RLS during pregnancy may still have symptoms three years after childbirth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare / Wiley-Blackwell , 2012. Vol. 91, no 7, 850-855 p.
Keyword [en]
Restless legs syndrome; pregnancy; snoring; sleep; sleep disturbance
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79784DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0412.2012.01404.xISI: 000305328000013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-79784DiVA: diva2:545004
Available from: 2012-08-17 Created: 2012-08-14 Last updated: 2017-12-07
In thesis
1. Sleep disorders during pregnancy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep disorders during pregnancy
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background

Sleep disorders are known to increase in prevalence during pregnancy, and associations between disturbed sleep during pregnancy and adverse outcomes for mother and child have been reported in a number of studies. However, most of these studies were retrospective and too small to satisfactorily demonstrate the association.

Aims

  • To prospectively investigate the development of snoring during pregnancy and assess if there is an association between snoring and sleepiness or adverse pregnancy outcomes.
  • To study the development of restless legs syndrome during and after pregnancy, and whether it is associated with snoring or other pregnancy-related symptoms.
  • To investigate the possible association between depressive symptoms in the postpartum period and sleep related problems during pregnancy, using screening instruments.
  • To objectively evaluate sleep disordered breathing in pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls and to evaluate differences in Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores between the two groups.

Methods

Questionnaires containing subjective rating of snoring, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and symptoms of restless legs were used in all studies. Information from the medical records of the pregnant women was also utilized. For objective evaluation of sleep disordered breathing, nocturnal respiratory recordings were used. In the research for the first three papers the same cohort of 500 pregnant women was followed on three occasions during pregnancy and also after delivery, and for the last paper, 100 other pregnant women were compared to 80 nonpregnant controls.

Results and conclusions

Both snoring and restless legs syndrome increase during pregnancy, but this had no convincing impact on obstetric outcome. Sleep recordings could not verify an increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among pregnant women. Restless legs syndrome was associated with snoring and could persist after delivery. Women who had high scores on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in the last trimester of pregnancy showed more depressive symptoms in the postpartum period. No difference in item scoring of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale was found between pregnant women and controls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. 80 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1446
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117869 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-117869 (DOI)978-91-7519-121-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-05-29, Berzeliussalen, Ingång 65, Campus US, Linköpiong, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-05-12 Created: 2015-05-12 Last updated: 2016-04-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

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