Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Customer experiences of resource integration: Reframing servicescapes using scripts and practices
Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

It is widely acknowledged that value can be regarded as interactively formed by customers through the integration of a variety of resources. However, it is difficult to find service research that takes these concepts seriously in empirical studies. Consequently, the aim of this thesis is to present an empirically grounded understanding of how customer resource integration takes place in practice and how customers experience their resource integration. By collecting data of public transport customers through qualitative diaries, interviews, and video recordings of situated action in addition to a survey, the thesis draws on script and practice theory.

The main contribution of the thesis is an empirically grounded model of customer experience of resource integration, which can be summarized in six propositions: (a) customers can acquire four different types of scripts: generic, incongruent, rigid, or transformative; (b) the script types are implicit parts of interactive value practices, which emerge as navigating and ticketing in the empirical context of public transport; (c) the interactive value practices are constellations of the resource integration activities of identifying, sense-making, and using, which customers focus on to varying extents, depending on their acquired script; (d) during or after interactive value formation customers potentially update their scripts; (e) customer processes, other customers, the physical environment, contact personnel, provider processes, and the wider environment all form the context of the service, but can also be resources that the customer integrates; and (f) the customer experience is a holistic evaluation of the interactive value formation and can be understood as consisting of three dimensions: a cognitive evaluation and two affective evaluations, positive activation and positive deactivation. As such, I reframe the notion of the servicescape in order for it to be more attuned to the perspective of interactive value formation and resource integration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2012. , 68 p.
Series
Karlstad University Studies, ISSN 1403-8099 ; 2012:38
Keyword [en]
Customer experience, resource integration, interactive value formation, servicescape, microethnography, public transport
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-14436ISBN: 978-91-7063-445-1 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-14436DiVA: diva2:542537
Public defence
2012-09-28, Agardhsalen, 11D257, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, 13:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-09-03 Created: 2012-08-01 Last updated: 2015-05-27Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. The role and design of the service environment in creating favourable customer experiences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role and design of the service environment in creating favourable customer experiences
2008 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The important role of the environment in service experiences is well established and accounted for in the marketing literature. Several theoretical frameworks and concepts have been suggested such as the servicescape. So far, the empirical studies have mainly focused on the effects of single variables, like music, scent or signage. Consequently, further empirical and conceptual research is needed with a holistic view. This paper contributes to this knowledge gap by building on a recent conceptualization of the experience room model. The aim of the study is to further explore design dimensions of an experience room. We examine the role of the experience room dimensions in the processes that result in the cocreation of value-in-use, while investigating their relative importance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping, Sweden: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2008
Series
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings, ISSN 1650-3686 (print), 1650-3740 (online) ; 033
Keyword
Service experience, experience room, design dimensions, experience map
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-14432 (URN)
Conference
11th QMOD Conference Quality Management and Organizational Development Attaining Sustainability From Organizational Excellence to Sustainable Excellence, 20–22 August, 2008 in Helsingborg, Sweden
Note

Part of thesis: Customer experiences of resource integration

Available from: 2012-09-03 Created: 2012-08-01 Last updated: 2015-05-27Bibliographically approved
2. Exploring the role of the service environment in forming customer's service experience
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the role of the service environment in forming customer's service experience
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 3, no 1, 110-124 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to identify and describe important dimensions of the service process as defined by customers, and to compare the results from a specific use context with the recent conceptualization of the experience room. Public transport travellers were provided with a public transport travel diary and were encouraged to make detailed notes about their service experience during their journey. The diaries were than transcribed and coded in NVivo8 using a constant comparative method. The qualitative analysis of the public transport travel diaries revealed six emerging themes of service experience: customer processes, other customers, physical environment, contact personnel, provider processes and wider environment. The interplay between these themes is what forms the service experience of customers. The inductive analysis of the empirical material contextualizes the experience room model in a utilitarian and facility-driven service. This deductive analysis of 100 customer experiences shows that the dimensions customer involvement, customer placement and physical artefacts are most important for the customer's service experience in this context. This paper offers a set of important empirically based customer experience dimensions with public transport. The paper also provides a contextualization of a theoretical model, the experience room model. The contribution results show the importance of interactions with other customers and the physical environment for the customer's experience

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley, UK: Emerald, 2011
Keyword
Transport services sector, Sweden, Customer satisfaction
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-10562 (URN)10.1108/17566691111115117 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
3. Measuring service experience: Applying the satisfaction with travel scale in public transport
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring service experience: Applying the satisfaction with travel scale in public transport
2012 (English)In: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 19, 413-418 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is argued that favorable customer service experiences are crucial for the success of a company’s offering, and research on the subject is growing rapidly. However, instruments for measuring service experience are not readily available. This study applies and validates the Satisfaction with Travel Scale (STS) for measuring the service experience in public transport. The results confirm that service experience is multidimensional, consisting of a cognitive dimension related to service quality and two affective dimensions related to positive activation, such as enthusiasm or boredom, and positive deactivation, such as relaxation or stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keyword
Satisfaction with travel scale; Service experience; Scale validation; Public transport
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-14431 (URN)10.1016/j.jretconser.2012.04.002 (DOI)
Note

Part of thesis: Customer experiences of resource integration

Available from: 2012-08-01 Created: 2012-08-01 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
4. Exploring internal mechanisms forming customer servicescape experiences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring internal mechanisms forming customer servicescape experiences
2012 (English)In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, Vol. 23, no 5, 677-695 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The aim of this paper is to explore customer interactions with servicescapes and to explain in more depth the internal mechanisms that form the customer service experience. Design/methodology/approach - The paper draws on an empirical study of customers using Swedish public transport systems. Data collection is based on a micro-ethnographic approach, using think-aloud protocols and video documentation. Findings - The results from the empirical study contribute with a framework of three constellations of activities and interactions: namely, identifying, sense-making, and using, which, depending on the empirical context, form two main customer process practices – navigating and ticketing. These constructs are theoretical and have implications for service research in the sense that they explain how customer experiences are formed. Practical implications - Managers should focus on making the servicescape design intuitive, meaningful and easy to use for their customers and, depending on the empirical context, support the customer processes of finding one’s way and ticketing. Limitations/Future research - While the conceptual framework is arguably applicable also to other servicescape processes and thus has the capacity to explain how a wide range of customer experiences are formed, the study is based on one industry. Consequently, it would be worthwhile to verify our framework in different service settings. Originality/value - The study is novel by applying a micro-ethnological research approach in order to provide a systematic empirical analysis of how constellations of activities and interactions in servicescape processes create customer responses and thus form the customer’s service experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012
Keyword
Service experience, servicescape, value co-creation, public transport, microethnography
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-14434 (URN)10.1108/09564231211269838 (DOI)000310046800004 ()
Available from: 2012-08-01 Created: 2012-08-01 Last updated: 2017-10-02Bibliographically approved
5. Interactions with servicescapes: A script-theoretical study of resource integration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactions with servicescapes: A script-theoretical study of resource integration
(English)In: Marketing Theory, ISSN Print ISSN: 1470-5931, Online ISSN: 1741-301XArticle in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

The importance of the servicescape is well established in the marketing literature. The prevailing view focuses on the effect of the servicescape on customers. Recently, the traditional view on servicescapes has been challenged by a view that conceives services and servicescapes as an issue for interaction and interactive value formation. The interactive view highlights resource integration and the knowledge and skills of customers. Yet, to date, empirical studies on this subject are still scarce. By applying a microethnographic research approach in a study of public transport customers and drawing on script theory, this paper identifies four types of customer scripts: generic, incongruent, rigid, and transformative scripts. Their role in resource integration activities of customers, as well as the customer experience, is discussed in this article.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Sage Publications
Keyword
Servicescape, customer experience, resource integration, interactive value formation, script theory, microethnography, public transport
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-14433 (URN)
Note

Part of thesis: Customer experiences of resource integration

Available from: 2012-08-01 Created: 2012-08-01 Last updated: 2012-09-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(949 kB)1647 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 949 kBChecksum SHA-512
38d4ecad0d483a2502e14c9e902cbdf046e9567182db3a60b093424349e5c01e99cee325741ac7146d4ae58655594429e1dc4c5d4b9dd35f7fa81a0e3ecf3a10
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Pareigis, Jörg
By organisation
Department of Business Administration
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 1647 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 6901 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf