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HUMAN FUTURE: Alternative ways of designing wearable medical devices
University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, The Department of Design, Crafts and Art (DKK), Industrial design.
2012 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

Technology is coming closer and closer to our bodies. A mobile phone for example is an item we tend to carry very close to us, in our pockets, in our hands or next to our ears. At the same time medical design is advancing in the area of wearable medical devices, and more and more people carry with them devices to improve their health, or even to sustain their lives. 

The level of interaction with our bodies of these devices may vary between a few inhalations a week, such as in the case of an inhaler for asthmatics, to completely implanted devices such as pacemakers. 

An insulin pump is an item that is worn all day and everyday. It is in constant interaction with the body as it continuously pumps the vital insulin into the diabetic person. The pump is accompanied by a glucose monitor which indicates the levels of insulin that are needed. 

By speaking to users of the pump as well as practitioners who work with them insights have been gathered into living with an insulin pump and with diabetes. 

Issues such as gender, class and ethnicity have been taken into account when analysing the experience and design of the products. The insights found by looking at the products in this way have been the basis of questioning the norms that have led to the current appearance and experience of the products and have helped shape a new design. The issues of pride and shame around diabetes and have also been addressed within the design process. 

Modern day wearable medical devices for diabetics are designed to look like either mobile devices or follow a diffusely “medical” style. Looking specifically at diabetes aids, this project explores alternative ways of designing these devices, with the aim of allowing space for both technology and the human body. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
Keyword [en]
industrial design diabetes wearable medical devices
National Category
Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:konstfack:diva-3698OAI: oai:DiVA.org:konstfack-3698DiVA: diva2:534112
Uppsok
Fine Art
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Examiners
Available from: 2013-02-06 Created: 2012-06-15 Last updated: 2013-02-06Bibliographically approved

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