Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Provitamin A carotenoids are independently associated with matrix metalloproteinase-9 in plasma samples from a general population
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
Show others and affiliations
2012 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 272, no 4, 371-384 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aim:  Carotenoids in plasma are inversely associated with cardiovascular risk. Low levels can be explained by low dietary intake but also by a number of other factors including inflammatory activity. Given that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 has an important role in inflammation and cardiovascular disease, we hypothesized that circulating MMP-9 levels would be inversely related to total or single carotenoids in a general population cohort. Methods:  A well-characterized population-based cohort of 285 Swedish men and women (45-69 years) was used for the present study. The intake of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire. Levels of MMP-9, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6 and six major carotenoids [β-cryptoxanthine, α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein (+ zeaxanthin) and lycopene] were determined in plasma. Results:  Lower plasma levels of total and single carotenoids were associated with lower dietary intake of carotenoids, older age, male sex, lower physical activity, higher alcohol consumption, higher body mass index (BMI), higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, lower levels of total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol and higher levels of CRP, IL-6 and MMP-9. After multivariate adjustments, plasma levels of total carotenoids and provitamin A carotenoids (β-cryptoxanthine, α-carotene and β-carotene) remained independently associated with sex, dietary intake of carotenoids, BMI, HDL cholesterol and MMP-9, while associations with CRP and IL-6 were not maintained. Neither dietary intake of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables, nor vitamin supplement use was associated with MMP-9, CRP or IL-6 levels. Conclusion:  Plasma carotenoids were associated with a variety of factors including age, sex, dietary intake and metabolic variables. A new finding was the independent relationship in plasma between low provitamin A carotenoids and high MMP-9, suggesting a link between these carotenoids, matrix turnover and arterial remodelling. © 2012 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. Vol. 272, no 4, 371-384 p.
Keyword [en]
CMOS, photon counting, spectral computed tomography, x-ray detection
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75982DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2012.2534x.xISI: 000308877500005PubMedID: 22372952OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-75982DiVA: diva2:511402
Note

funding agencies|Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation||Swedish Research Council||Linkoping University||

Available from: 2012-03-21 Created: 2012-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-07

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(485 kB)296 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 485 kBChecksum SHA-512
7220a0bb72420c960c3ad6547cac430132a37b2da01756788a6bbebde8e1b8f68a4f6df996a194c364572bad3e29d7a5c9ff1e3d88153a4d5159e2faa16ce09d
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Rydén, MireilleGarvin, PeterKristenson, MargaretaLeanderson, PerErnerudh, JanJonasson, Lena
By organisation
CardiologyFaculty of Health SciencesDivision of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health ScienceOccupational and Environmental MedicineOccupational and Environmental Medicine CentreClinical ImmunologyDepartment of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion MedicineDepartment of Cardiology UHL
In the same journal
Journal of Internal Medicine
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 296 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 163 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf