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How to think about interprofessional competence: A metacognitive model
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 26, no 2, 85-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Different professions meet and work together in teams every day in health and social care. To identify and deliver the best quality of care for the patient, teamwork should be both professionally and interprofessionally competent. How can enhanced education prepare teamworkers to be both professionally and interprofessionally competent? To achieve interprofessional skills and design effective interprofessional curricula, there is a need for metacognitive frameworks focusing on the relationship between theories and the problem-solving process as well as the structure and content of professional competence. The aim of this article is to discuss the need for shared metacognitive structures/models as a tool for securing successful interprofessional learning and developing personal, professional and interprofessional competence to improve the quality of care. A metacognitive model for interprofessional education and practice is presented in this article. This model has been developed as a tool for analyzing professional competence on three levels: individual, team and organization. The model comprises seven basic components of professional competence and the way they are related and interact. Examples of how this metacognitive model can be used in the early, middle and late stages in interprofessional education are given.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare , 2012. Vol. 26, no 2, 85-91 p.
Keyword [en]
Collaborative competence, interprofessional education, qualitative method, shared problem-solving
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75898DOI: 10.3109/13561820.2011.644644ISI: 000300680100003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-75898DiVA: diva2:510552
Note
Funding Agencies|Faculty of Health Sciences at Linkoping University, Sweden||Available from: 2012-03-16 Created: 2012-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07
In thesis
1. Developing Interprofessional Competence: Theoretical and Empirical Contributions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing Interprofessional Competence: Theoretical and Empirical Contributions
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Different professions meet and work together in teams every day in health and social care. In order to idenUiy and deliver the best quality of care for the patient, the teamworkers need to be both professionally and interprofessionally competent. How can higher education prepare teamworkers to be both professionillly and interprofcssionally competent? This thesis seeks to contribute theoretically and empirically to this issuc. A starting point for interprofessional education (WE) worldwide was when WHO presented a document entitled "Leaming Together to Work Together for Bdter Health". The basic idea in this strateg)' was that it is favourable for undergraduilte students and the development of their own professionill identity to experience other professions in health and sodal sectors as earlyas during their undcrgraduate studies. Inherent in this scheme is that the various professions will work together in practice. Thc overall winner in this new thinking about education and professionai prLlctice would be the patient. One of the Hrst systematic attempts to organize IPE academically was initiated in 1986 at the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) at Linköping University in Sweden. The "Linköping Model" has now yielded 25 yeilrs of practical experience and development of IPE curricula.

Aims: The overall aims of this thesis we.re to define, describe and measure effects and outcomes of interprofessional education/learning.

Methods: In the research papers theoretical, aualitative and quantitative methods have been used.

Results: The newly registered medical doctors educated at the FHS at Linköping University and exposed to WE and PBL reported more confidence (p < 0.0001) that their lIndergraduate studies had given them interprofessional skilIs and abilities to collaborate with other professions than medical students from all other medical faculties in Sweden. Nurses who hild been exposed to interprofessional curricula during their undergraduate education ilt FHS reported to greater extent (p = 0.003) that they were prepared to work as a nurse. Furthermore, they also reported to a greater extent (p < 0.0001) that their undergraduate education hild prepared them to work with other healt care professions. Other findings in this thesis wcre that female tudents in generill and nursing students had a more positive view of interprofessional learning and were more open-minded about collaboration with other professions. Only to a minor extent did exposure to a more extensive interprofessional curriculum promote a positive attitude towards teamwork.

Conclusions: A major challenge to modern health care is the need for more interprofessional teamwork to improve the safety and quality of patient-centred care. This thesis indicates some directions for more successful interprofessional education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011. 89 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1189
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69603 (URN)978-91-7393-350-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-06-09, Hälsans Hus Universitetssjukhuset, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-07-05 Created: 2011-07-05 Last updated: 2013-09-05Bibliographically approved

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Wilhelmsson, MargaretaPelling, StaffanUhlin, LarsDahlgren, Lars-OveFaresjö, TomasForslund, Kenneth
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Nursing ScienceFaculty of Health SciencesStudies in Adult, Popular and Higher EducationFaculty of Educational SciencesGeneral PracticeDepartment of Behavioural Sciences and LearningFaculty of Arts and Sciences
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