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Feeding intensity, diet, and survival in relation to body size of juvenile pink salmon
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2633-4178
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract

Variations in body size and growth rates in a cohort of juvenile fish can lead to differences in the feeding ecology of different sized conspecifics, thus, increasing differential survival in the cohort. Consequently, identifying the relationships between body size, feeding ecology, and survival is important in understanding mortality of juvenile fishes during the early marine life phase. We used feeding intensity, diet composition, and growth rate data collected from juvenile pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) to investigate how feeding ecology differs between large and small conspecifics and how the growth rates of large and small individuals influences overall marine survivorship. The sampling occurred from 1997-2004 and encompassed three marine habitats in the northern Gulf of Alaska. Feeding intensity did not significantly differ between large and small individuals across all habitats. Diet composition varied more among years and habitats than between large and small individuals. Within a year and habitat the diet composition of large and small conspecifics differed more in offshore waters than the near shore habitats with larger pink salmon eating more fish and less large copepods than smaller conspecifics. Growth positively related to marine survival in all habitats. The growth of fish sampled in offshore habitats related stronger to survival than the growth of fish in the near shore habitats. Within the offshore waters, the growth rates of larger individuals better explained marine survival than the growth of smaller conspecifics. These results suggest that diet composition does differ between small and large conspecifics on small temporal and spatial scales, which may allow larger individuals to exploit bigger and more energy rich prey, resulting in increase survival of larger fish.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-11323OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-11323DiVA, id: diva2:494901
Conference
American Fisheries Society, Alaska Chapter 2009 Annual Meeting
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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