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Medical outcome in epilepsy patients of young adulthood: A five year follow up study
Linköping university.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
2009 (English)In: Seizure, ISSN 1059-1311, E-ISSN 1532-2688, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 293-297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The appearance of new anti-epileptic drugs (AED) during the last decade has provided neurologists and their patients with a greater choice, but the proof for their superiority over traditional AEDs is sparse, especially their use in adolescence and young adulthood. We studied a group of young adults (18–27 years) with epilepsy and compared their situation in 2004 with those 5 years earlier.

Materials and methodsThe participants (n = 97) answered questionnaires regarding seizure-frequency, AED, side-effects and quality-of-life. Information was also taken from medical records.

ResultsThe use of new generation AEDs increased during the 5-year study period, particularly among women. However seizure frequency had not changed significantly over time, and compared to men the effectiveness in controlling seizures was lower in women. The participants reported normal quality-of-life (QOL), which may indicate that the increase in number of AEDs to choose from actually improved the situation for these young adults with epilepsy. Frequency of seizures and cognitive side-effects of AEDs were associated with a lower QOL.

ConclusionsMore women than men seem to be treated with new AEDs, and that the increase in use of new AEDs does not reduce seizure frequency in young adulthood. The effectiveness in controlling seizures seems to be lower in women in the age group studied. Further studies are required to better understand how epilepsy related factors interact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2009. Vol. 18, no 4, p. 293-297
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-11165DOI: 10.1016/j.seizure.2008.11.009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-11165DiVA, id: diva2:494734
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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