Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Violence and self-reported health. Does individual socioeconomic position matter?
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institute, SE-17176 Sweden..
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institute, SE-17176 Sweden..
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5221-9504
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
2012 (English)In: Journal of Injury and Violence Research, ISSN 2008-2053, E-ISSN 2008-4072, Vol. 4, no 2, 87-95 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Violence is a major public health problem. Both clinical and population based studies shows that violence against men and women has physical and psychological health consequences. However, elsewhere and in Sweden little is known of the effect of individual socioeconomic position (SEP) on the relation between violence and health outcomes. Objective: This study aimed to assess the effect of individual SEP on the relation between violence and three health outcomes (general health, pain and anxiety) among women in Stockholm County. METHODS: The study used data from the Stockholm Public Health Survey, a cross-sectional survey carried out in 2006 for the Stockholm County Council by Statistic Sweden. 34 704 respondents answered the survey, the response rate was sixty one percent. Analyses were carried out using descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis in SPSS v.17.0. RESULTS: Individual SEP increased the odds of reporting poor health outcomes among victimized women in Stockholm County. Regarding self-reported health women in low-SEP who reported victimization in the past twelve months had odds of 2,36 (95% CI 1.48-3.77) for the age group 18-29 years and 3.78 (95% CI 2.53-5.64) for the age group 30-44 years compared with women in high-SEP and non-victim. For pain the odds was 2,41 (95% CI 1,56-3,73) for the age group 18-29 years and 2,98 (95% CI 1,99-4,46) for women aged 30-44 years. Regarding anxiety the age group 18-29 years had odds of 2,53 (95% CI 1,58-4,03) and for the age group 30-44 years had odds of 3,87 (95% CI 2,55-5,87). CONCLUSION: Results showed that individual SEP (measured by occupation) matters to the relationship between violence and health outcomes such as general self-reported health, pain and anxiety. Women in lower SEP who experienced victimization in the past twelve months had increased odds of reporting poorer self-rated health, pain and anxiety compared to those in higher SEP with no experience of victimization. However, further exploration of the relationship between poverty, individual SEP is needed using other Swedish population samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 4, no 2, 87-95 p.
Keyword [en]
Violence, Self-reported health, Socioeconomic position, Inequalities; Injury prevention, Stockholm, Sweden
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-15831DOI: 10.5249/jivr.v4i2.122ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84872009255OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-15831DiVA: diva2:489028
Available from: 2012-02-02 Created: 2012-02-02 Last updated: 2016-10-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(234 kB)4 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 234 kBChecksum SHA-512
81abdee9be958e7a8e765e542bbee3a7ccfb9740229c4b0a2e007c35f218f78e2aabbc9681293ece598151d8b25e4183d4c7017fd7d55128b0533ace2a4016e0
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopushttp://jivresearch.org/jivr/index.php/jivr/article/view/122

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Soares, JoaquimMacassa, Gloria
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of Injury and Violence Research
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 4 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 48 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link