Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Conceptualizing life balance from an empirical and occupational therapy perspective
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Although it is an important concept in occupational therapy, there is a need for further knowledge about life balance. This thesis explores the concept oflife balance - how people think about it and how it is used in occupational therapy.

Aim: The overall aim of the present thesis was to conceptualize life balance from an empirical and occupational therapy perspective in order to contribute to knowledge regarding the use of the concept in occupational therapy. The specific aims were to:

  • explore the perceptions of life balance among working people who had not recently been on long-term sick leave
  • explore what is considered important for life balance and whether or not this differs between people
  • use perceptions of life balance data from men and women in a healthy population to validate the Model of Lifestyle Balance
  • clarify the content in the concept of occupational balance as used within published articles related to occupational therapy

Methods: In Study I, 19 participants were interviewed about their perceptions of lifebalance. In Study II, 32 participants sorted statements about life balance according to their importance. In Study III, data from Study I were reanalysed in relation to Matuska and Christiansen’s Model of Lifestyle Balance. In Study IV a concept analysis of occupational balance in occupational therapy was conducted, encompassing 43 articles.

Results: Life balance was shown to be a subjective, dynamic, health-related and multidimensional concept. Similarities and differences between what the participants consider to be important for their life balance were revealed. Occupational balance was, in the concept analysis, shown to be a subjectively defined perception of having the right amount and variation of occupations.

Conclusions: The results of the thesis indicate that life balance and occupational balance are two separate concepts. While life balance includes occupational balance, it goes beyond it and also includes other aspects. Future research is requried to investigate the generality of the findings. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University , 2012. , 72 p.
Series
Hälsohögskolans avhandlingsserie, ISSN 1654-3602 ; 25
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17220OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-17220DiVA: diva2:479749
Public defence
2012-02-10, Forum Humanum, Barnarpsgatan 39, Jönköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-01-27 Created: 2012-01-18 Last updated: 2012-01-27Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Perceptions of life balance among a working population in Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of life balance among a working population in Sweden
Show others...
2011 (English)In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 3, 410-418 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A life in balance is commonly related to health and well-being. However, our knowledge regarding the perceptions of life balance among the general population is limited. Our aim was to explore the perception of life balance among working people without recent long-term sick leave. Individual interviews were conducted with 7 men and 12 women and analyzed according to grounded theory, aiming at achieving a description. The results showed that life balance includes four interrelated dimensions: activity balance, balance in body and mind, balance in relation to others, and time balance. Life balance was regarded by the participants as health related, promoted by a sense of security, and affected by context and individual strategies. Life balance was also seen as being individually defined and dynamic. The results indicate that the perceptions of life balance might be quite general because they show similarities with previous research on different populations.

Keyword
grounded theory, health and well-being, health promotion, interviews
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-13612 (URN)10.1177/1049732310379240 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-10-23 Created: 2010-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
2. What is considered important for life balance? Similarities and differences among some working adults
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is considered important for life balance? Similarities and differences among some working adults
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 4, 377-384 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Life balance seems subjective, health related, and multidimensional. However, the concept is complex. Exploring what people themselves consider more or less important for their life balance and whether this differs between people would develop new knowledge. Q methodology was chosen for the present study, in which 32 working men and women without recent long-term sick leave participated. They sorted 42 statements regarding life balance according to their importance for each participant's life balance. The analysis resulted in four different viewpoints concerning life balance. All four viewpoints considered good relationships with those closest to them, as well as knowing that these people were doing well, as important. Each viewpoint also showed a unique orientation towards what was considered important for life balance: occupational balance (viewpoint 1), self-actualization (viewpoint 2), self-awareness (viewpoint 3), and reciprocal relationships (viewpoint 4). The results. showed support for life balance as being a subjective, multidimensional, and health-related phenomenon. The results demonstrated the importance of relationships for life balance and heterogeneity in what people considered important for their own life balance.

Keyword
Q methodology, self-reported health, subjectivity, Sweden, Western socio cultural perspective
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-14697 (URN)10.3109/11038128.2011.645552 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-02-24 Created: 2011-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
3. Validating the model of lifestyle balance on a working Swedish population
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validating the model of lifestyle balance on a working Swedish population
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 19, no 2, 106-114 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An analysis of data from a previously conducted grounded theory study exploring perceptions of life balance among 19 working adults without recent long term sick leave was carried out. The aim of this secondary analysis was to use these perceptions of life balance to validate the Model of Lifestyle Balance proposed by Matuska and Christiansen. For the validation, a matrix was used. The results showed that Matuska and Christiansen's five need-based dimensions were represented by the participants’ perceptions of life balance, but also an additional aspect not included in the model. The participants stressed healthy habits in relation to sleep, exercise and eating, and good relationships as important for life balance. Furthermore, it was described as important to perceive sufficient challenge and meaningfulness in their occupations and to organize time and energy. Finally, the participants stressed financial security as important for life balance. These findings provide additional evidence of the validity of the Model of Lifestyle Balance, a model that appears to be useful in occupational science.

Keyword
Everyday life, Health promotion, Occupational balance, Qualitative methods, Well-being
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-13610 (URN)10.1080/14427591.2011.575760 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-10-23 Created: 2010-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
4. Occupational balance as used in occupational therapy: A concept analysis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational balance as used in occupational therapy: A concept analysis
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 4, 322-327 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Occupational balance is a frequently used concept in occupational therapy, but it is complex and differences in content exist. Further knowledge would be valuable for scholars, practitioners, and measurement development. Concept analysis is a way to clarify concepts. The present concept analysis used Walker and Avant's procedure for analysing the concept of occupational balance, with 43 articles included in the analysis. The results showed that occupational balance can be defined as the individual's perception of having the right amount of occupations and the right variation between occupations. Three perspectives of occupational balance were identified: in relation to occupational areas, in relation to occupations with different characteristics, and in relation to time use. The knowledge gained may guide the use of the concept, and some suggestions are made for its use and for further research.

Keyword
concept analysis, concept development, occupational balance
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-14696 (URN)10.3109/11038128.2011.596219 (DOI)21780985 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-02-24 Created: 2011-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(3602 kB)4624 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 3602 kBChecksum SHA-512
0195d549aa494d7dbbd191b6886dc53dc9c08060a64aa11d0a0029e2117cfa25a24475e818a6269d328773b3fe153823f58068b7da4342d823269a998f206467
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wagman, Petra
By organisation
HHJ, Dep. of RehabilitationHHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 4624 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 2406 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf