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Childhood Peer Status and the Clustering of Adverse Living Conditions in Adulthood
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
2012 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Within the context of the school class, children attain a social position in the peer hierarchy to which varying amounts of status are attached. Several studies have shown that children’s peer status is associated with a wide range of social and health-related outcomes. These studies commonly target separate outcomes, paying little attention to the fact that such circumstances are likely to go hand in hand. The overarching aim of the present study was therefore to examine the impact of childhood peer status on the clustering of living conditions in adulthood. Based on a 1953 cohort born in Stockholm, Sweden, multinomial regression analysis demonstrated that children who had lower peer status also had exceedingly high risks of ending up in more problem-burdened clusters as adults. Moreover, these associations remained after adjusting for a variety of family-related circumstances. We conclude that peer status constitutes a central aspect of children’s upbringing with important consequences for subsequent life chances, over and above the influences originating from the family.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. , 37 p.
Swedish Institute for Social Research, ISSN 0283-8222 ; 1/2012
National Category
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-69224OAI: diva2:475571
Available from: 2012-01-11 Created: 2012-01-11 Last updated: 2012-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Y.B. Almquist, L. Brännström WP 1/2012(160 kB)338 downloads
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Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

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