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Medical technology and its impact on palliative home care as a secure base experienced by patients, next-of-kin and district nurses
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: School of Health Sciences , 2011. , 148 p.
Series
Hälsohögskolans avhandlingsserie, ISSN 1654-3602 ; 21
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17026OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-17026DiVA: diva2:474468
Public defence
2011-12-02, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Next-of-kin caregivers in palliative home care: from control to loss of control
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Next-of-kin caregivers in palliative home care: from control to loss of control
2008 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 64, no 6, 578-586 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This paper is a report of a study to describe situations influencing next-of-kin caregivers' ability to manage palliative care in the home.

BACKGROUND: Palliative home care often involves major resources from next-of-kin, municipal and county personnel. Next-of-kin caregivers' situation is depicted as so demanding and exhausting that it can affect their mental health and limit their ability to continue as a caregiver.

METHODS: A qualitative study using the Critical Incident Technique was conducted. Nine next-of-kin caregivers from palliative home care were strategically chosen and data were collected using audiotaped interviews in 2005.

FINDINGS: The analysis resulted in two main areas: 'Maintaining control' and 'Losing control'. Next-of-kin caregivers wanted to maintain control over their lives by being continuously available 24 hours a day and by supporting and taking complete responsibility for all of the patient's needs. They lost this control when professional assistance was lacking and they described feelings of inadequacy when their physical energy or time was insufficient. They felt incapable as the patient's physical or mental persona metamorphosed or as serious symptoms developed that they could not control.

CONCLUSION: Next-of-kin caregivers and the patients must feel free to choose where palliative home care will be provided and that their choice at any time can be re-evaluated, due to insecurity or workload changes. When planning for palliative care, they should be informed that having only one caregiver reduces the chances of completing palliative care in the home.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-7323 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2648.2008.04819.x (DOI)19120572 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-01-09 Created: 2009-01-09 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
2. District nurses´ conceptions of medical technology in palliative home care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>District nurses´ conceptions of medical technology in palliative home care
2011 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, no 7, 845-854 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim  The aim of this study was to describe district nurses’ conceptions of medical technology in palliative homecare.

Background  Medical technology has, in recent years, been widely used in palliative homecare. Personnel with varying degrees of training and knowledge must be able to handle the new technology.

Methods  A descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach was chosen to describe qualitatively different conceptions of the phenomenon medical technology. Interviews with 16 district nurses working with palliative homecare were analysed and five descriptive categories emerged.

Results  Medical technology in palliative homecare led to vulnerability because of increasing demands and changing tasks. When medical technology was used in the home it demanded collaboration between all involved actors. It also demanded self-reliance and an awareness of managing medical technology in a patient-safe way. Medical technology provided freedom for the palliative patients.

Conclusions  To maintain patient safety, more education and collaboration with palliative care teams is needed. Next-of-kin are considered as an important resource but their participation must be based on their own conditions.

Implications for nursing management  District nurses need regular training on medical devices, must be more specialized in this kind of care and must not fragment their working time within other specialities.

Keyword
district nurses, medical technology, palliative homecare, phenomenography
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-16150 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2834.2011.01231.x (DOI)
Available from: 2011-09-22 Created: 2011-09-22 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved
3. Next-of-kin's conceptions of medical technology in palliative homecare
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Next-of-kin's conceptions of medical technology in palliative homecare
2012 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 13/14, 1868-1877 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives.  Describe next-of-kin’s conceptions of medical technology in palliative homecare.

Background.  Next-of-kin to palliative patients are in an exposed position with increasing responsibility. The more involved they are in the care, the greater caregiver burden they describe. Medical technology has become increasingly common in palliative homecare, and previous research suggests that the devices transform the homes to a hospital ward, thus shifting responsibility from the personnel to the next-of-kin.

Design.  An explorative descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach was chosen to describe qualitatively different conceptions of the phenomenon medical technology.

Method.  Interviews with 15 next-of-kin to patients in palliative homecare were analysed in a seven-step process where 10 conceptions emerged in five description categories.

Results.  Medical technology in palliative homecare required next-of-kin’s responsibility in monitoring or providing practical help. It also implied uncertainty among the next-of-kin because of worries about its safety or because of an improper handling. The technology trespassed on daily life because it restricted and affected the private sphere. Medical technology enabled comfort as it implied security and was a prerequisite for the patient to be cared for at home. It also required an adjustment to comprehend and manage the medical technology.

Conclusions.  Medical technology resulted in an increased caregiver burden and uncertainty among the next-of-kin. Although it meant restrictions and affected their social life, they had great confidence in its possibilities.

Relevance to clinical practice.  It is important to limit the amount of personnel and materials in the home to avoid trespassing on the family’s daily life. Medical personnel also have to be sensitive to what next-of-kin have the strength to do and not use them as informal caregivers.

Keyword
medical technology, next-of-kin, nurses, nursing, palliative homecare, phenomenography
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17022 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04123.x (DOI)22582763 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
4. Patients' understanding of medical technology in palliative home care: a qualitative analysis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' understanding of medical technology in palliative home care: a qualitative analysis
2012 (English)In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 14, no 3, 191-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Healthcare reforms and reductions in the number of hospital beds are leading to an increasing amount of medical technology moving from hospitals into home care, affecting the daily lives of patients. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the ways patients understand medical technology in palliative home care. With use of a phenomenographic approach, 15 patients with medical technology were interviewed, and data were analyzed in a 7-step process. Three ways of understanding the phenomenon emerged: a masterful patient, an adjustable patient, and a restricted patient. Masterful patients took control over the medical technology and were mostly independent of assistance from personnel. Adjustable patients accepted and adapted their lives to the medical technology and were satisfied with assistance from the personnel. Restricted patients were reminded daily of the medical technology and dependent on assistance from personnel. Depending on the patients’ health conditions, the support from the personnel, and the impact of medical technology, a transfer between the different ways of understanding occurred with a simultaneous movement between independence and dependence. The patient exhibited various ways of understanding, although one way of understanding was more dominant.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-17024 (URN)10.1097/NJH.0b013e3182404b71 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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