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Practical epistemologies in physical education practice
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. (SMED)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8748-8843
2013 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 18, no 3, 311-333 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With a point of departure in a transactional understanding of epistemology, the purpose of this paper is to explore practical epistemologies in PE by investigating how knowledge is produced and reproduced in students’ and teachers’ actions in PE practices posted as clips on the user-generated video sharing website YouTube. YouTube can be understood as a disordered public video archive of (in this case) ongoing PE practices created by both students and teachers. With a transactional understanding, knowing, and in consequence questions of epistemology, can be conceived of as something we do; something practical (Dewey & Bentley 1949). In this paper, practical epistemologies in PE are, in line with Dewey (1938, 1941), investigated by exploring ends-in-view and habits-of-action in students’ and teachers’ actions in PE practice. The practical epistemologies identified in the study are: (i) Knowing by doing correct movements, (ii) Knowing by trying, (iii) Knowing by imitating, (iv) Knowing by praising and cheering, (v) Knowing by cooperating, (vi) Knowing by creating, (vii) Knowing by being changed into gym clothes, (viii) Knowing by acting in a certain locality and (ix) Knowing by resisting. The categories represent different ways of how knowledge is produced and reproduced in PE practice and describe the functions that different actions and actors have in how knowledge is produced and reproduced as well as in the direction this takes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxfordshire, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2013. Vol. 18, no 3, 311-333 p.
Keyword [en]
Habit, ends-in-view, knowing, learning, knowledge, YouTube
National Category
Social Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20161DOI: 10.1080/13573322.2011.582245ISI: 000319495500003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84878603769OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-20161DiVA: diva2:450921
Available from: 2011-10-24 Created: 2011-10-24 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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