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Influence of age, hypertension or myocardial infarction on cardiovascular responses to changes in body position: a population-based study in 30-, 50- and 60-year-old men
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
2000 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

An age-related attenuation of the normal increase in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate upon standing has previously been observed in man. Whether this is due to aging as such or is a consequence of a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease in older compared to younger subjects is unclear. This population-based study addresses this question and presents the blood pressure and heart rate responses to sudden changes in body position in representative groups of men aged 30 (n=50), 50 (n=44) and 60 (n=69) years, as well as in 60-year-old men with hypertension (n=75) or previous myocardial infarction (n=39) and in a control group (n=41) free from these diseases.

Blood pressure and heart rate were measured during three seven-minute periods (supinestanding-supine), using an unbiased non-invasive method. Whereas there was an initial decrease in systolic blood pressure upon standing in men aged 50 and 60 years, an increase was seen in the 30-year-olds. The diastolic blood pressure increased in all age groups, but less in the older compared to the younger men. In all age groups, the change in systolic blood pressure upon standing was transient, while the changes in the diastolic blood pressure lasted during the entire observation period. The heart rate increased to a similar extent upon standing in all age groups. After resuming the supine position, both blood pressure and heart rate returned to the levels initially recorded. The cardiovascular responses were both qualitatively and quantitatively similar in all three groups of 60-year-old men (with or without hypertension or previous myocardial infarction).

In conclusion, this population-based study confirmed previous observations of an age-related attenuation of the blood pressure response to change in body position. However, 60-year-old men with hypertension or previous myocardial infarction had blood pressure responses similar to those of men of the same age and free from these diseases. This indicates that the attenuated response in older compared to younger subjects is not explained by the higher prevalence of these cardiovascular diseases in the elderly, but appears to be the result of normal aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University , 2000. , 39 p.
Keyword [en]
Age factors, blood pressure, epidemiology, hypertension, myocardial infarction
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-156721ISBN: 91-506-1433-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-156721DiVA: diva2:432968
Available from: 2011-08-09 Created: 2011-08-08 Last updated: 2011-08-09Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Age-related differences in blood pressure and heart rate responses to changes in body position: results from a study with serial measurements in the supine and standing positions in 30-, 50- and 60-year-old men
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-related differences in blood pressure and heart rate responses to changes in body position: results from a study with serial measurements in the supine and standing positions in 30-, 50- and 60-year-old men
1999 (English)In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 8, no 4, 220-226 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This population-based study presents the blood pressure and heart rate responses to sudden changes in body position in representative groups of men aged 30 (n = 50), 50 (n = 44) and 60 (n = 69) years, using an unbiased method for non-invasive blood pressure measurements. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured every minute during three 7-min periods in the supine, standing and again supine positions. Whereas there was an initial decrease in systolic blood pressure upon standing in men aged 50 and 60 years, an increase was seen in the 30-year-olds. The diastolic blood pressure increased in all age groups, but less in the older compared to the younger men. In all age groups, the changes in systolic blood pressure upon standing were transient, while the changes in the diastolic blood pressure lasted during the entire observation period. The heart rate increased to a similar extent upon standing in all age groups. No symptomatic hypotension was observed. After resuming the supine position, both blood pressure and heart rate returned towards the levels initially recorded. This population-based study confirms previous observations in selected subjects of age-related attenuation in blood pressure response to change in body position. The study also shows that blood pressure and heart rate are rapidly stabilized upon standing up.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-53179 (URN)10697302 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-10-17 Created: 2008-10-17 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
2. Does hypertension or a previous myocardial infarction influence the bloodpressure and heart rate responses to changes in body position?: results from a study with serial measurements in the supine and standing positions in 60-year-old-men
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does hypertension or a previous myocardial infarction influence the bloodpressure and heart rate responses to changes in body position?: results from a study with serial measurements in the supine and standing positions in 60-year-old-men
2000 (English)In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 9, no 6, 315-322 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An age-related attenuation of the normal increase in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate upon standing has previously been observed in man. Whether this is due to ageing as such, or a consequence of a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease in older compared to younger subjects, is unclear. This population-based study was conducted to address this question. It was carried out in three groups of 60-year-old men: (i) with hypertension (n = 75), (ii) with a previous myocardial infarction (n = 39), and (iii) without any of these diseases, thus constituting a control group (n = 41). Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed during three 7-min periods (supine-standing-supine), using an unbiased non-invasive method. The cardiovascular responses were both qualitatively and quantitatively similar in all three groups, i.e. the increases in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate upon standing, and decreases upon laying down, were of a similar magnitude. In conclusion, 60-year-old men with hypertension or a previous myocardial infarction had blood pressure and heart rate responses similar to those of men of the same age who did not have these diseases. This indicates that the attenuated response previously reported in older compared to younger people is not explained by the higher prevalence of these cardiovascular diseases in the elderly, but is merely an age-dependent characteristic.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-53585 (URN)11212059 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-03-21 Created: 2007-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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