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Breaking down the wall of difficulty: Adapting a translation for new readers
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
2010 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This study is an analysis of a translation of the text ”A Lotta Night Music: The Sound of Film Noir” written by Richard R. Ness. The study focuses on the adaption of film and music terminology as well as complex sentence structures for a new and broader target audience. The analysis was accomplished with the help of Marianne Lederer’s theory of deverbalization and re-expression. Furthermore, Vinay and Darbelnet’s methodology for translation was utilized along with Andrew Chesterman’s syntactic strategies in order to help clarify the restructuring.

                      First of all, concerning film and music terminology, the main issue of interest was how to best adapt the terms for the target readers. From the analysis of various examples of difficult terminology it was concluded that the strategy best used for the different terms depends on the presupposed knowledge of the target reader. Whether you borrow, translate literally or adapt is a matter of how much the target reader knows beforehand.

                      Secondly, as for the complex sentence structures of this highly academic text, the extensive, highly hypotactic sentences were extracted and broken down into shorter sentences while keeping the author’s message intact. In this way, the readability was increased and hence the text was adapted for a wider target audience. Moreover, the fact that readability increased was proven with the aid of LIX, a means of measuring the degree of difficulty of a specific text.

                      Finally, it has been determined in this study that, although this particular text is still highly academic, breaking down overly long sentences generally helps to increase readability without compromising the author’s intended message.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. , 29 p.
Keyword [en]
Translation; Adaption; Terminology; Sentence Structure
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-12578OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-12578DiVA: diva2:423532
Subject / course
English
Presentation
2011-06-10, Blenda, Växjö, 16:24 (English)
Uppsok
Humanities, Theology
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2011-07-05 Created: 2011-06-15 Last updated: 2012-04-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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