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Environmental evaluation of carbon capture and storage technology and large scale deployment scenarios
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering Science and Technology, Industrial Ecology Programme. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering Science and Technology, Department of Energy and Process Engineering.
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is the most viable option to reduce CO2 emissions from power plants while continuing the use of fossil fuels required to satisfy the increasing energy demand. However, CCS is an energy intensive process, and demands additional energy, chemicals and infrastructure. The capture processes may also have certain direct emissions to air (NH3, aldehydes, solvent vapor etc.) and generate solid wastes from degradation byproducts. A trade-off in environmental impacts is expected, and with the large-scale application of CCS needed to make any significant reduction in CO emissions, these potential trade-offs can become enormous in magnitude. Therefore a systematic process of evaluation of complete life cycle for all available CCS options and large-scale CCS deployment scenarios is needed. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is wellestablished and best suited for such analysis.

Methodology of hybrid life cycle assessment is used in this work and methodological developments are made to build-up simple approaches for evaluation of future CCS systems and scenarios. The thesis also extends the result presentation to more comprehensible damage indicators and evaluates control potentials for human health, ecosystem damage and resource depletion for the technology.

The results of the study shows that the CCS systems achieve significant reduction in global warming impact but have multiple environmental trade-offs depending on the technology. These trade-offs are mainly due to energy penalty from capture process, infrastructure development and waste treatment processes. Damage assessment shows that the CCS systems greatly reduce human health damage and ecosystem damage by mitigating the climate change impact while increasing the resource consumption. Scenario assessment results show the clear advantage of global CCS integration scenarios over the Baseline scenario having significantly lower impact potential scores for all impact and damage categories from fossil-based electricity production.

This thesis thus illustrates the assessment of a novel technology, its overall benefits and damages, development potentials and the implications of its large scale application.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NTNU, 2011.
Series
Doctoral theses at NTNU, ISSN 1503-8181 ; 2011:30
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:no:ntnu:diva-12344ISBN: 978-82-471-2578-6 (printed ver.)ISBN: 978-82-471-2580-9 (electronic ver.)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ntnu-12344DiVA: diva2:407148
Public defence
2011-03-11, 00:00
Available from: 2011-03-29 Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2011-03-30Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Life cycle assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant with post-combustion carbon capture, transport and storage.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life cycle assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant with post-combustion carbon capture, transport and storage.
2010 (English)In: International Journal of Greenhouse Gas ControlArticle in journal (Refereed) In press
Identifiers
urn:nbn:no:ntnu:diva-12338 (URN)10.1016/j.ijggc.2010.03.006. (DOI)
Available from: 2011-03-28 Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2011-03-30Bibliographically approved
2. Human and environmental impact assessment of post-combustion CO2 capture focusing on emissions from amine-based scrubbing solvents.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human and environmental impact assessment of post-combustion CO2 capture focusing on emissions from amine-based scrubbing solvents.
2010 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 44, no 4, 1496-1502 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:no:ntnu:diva-12339 (URN)10.1021/es902116r (DOI)
Available from: 2011-03-28 Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2012-07-04Bibliographically approved
3. Comparative impact assessment of CCS portfolio: Life cycle perspective
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative impact assessment of CCS portfolio: Life cycle perspective
2011 (English)In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 4, 2486-2493 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:no:ntnu:diva-12340 (URN)10.1016/j.egypro.2011.02.144 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-03-28 Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2012-05-15Bibliographically approved
4. Environmental damage assessment of carbon capture and storage : Application of end-point indicators
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental damage assessment of carbon capture and storage : Application of end-point indicators
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:no:ntnu:diva-12342 (URN)
Note
Submitted to Journal of Industrial EcologyAvailable from: 2011-03-28 Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2011-03-29Bibliographically approved
5. Environmental assessment of fossil-based electricity scenarios: Implications of carbon capture and storage.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental assessment of fossil-based electricity scenarios: Implications of carbon capture and storage.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:no:ntnu:diva-12343 (URN)
Available from: 2011-03-28 Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2011-03-29Bibliographically approved

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