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Comparison of injuries sustained on artificial turf and grass by male and female elite football players.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6883-1471
Centre for Sports Medicine, University of Nottingham, UK.
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 21, no 6, 824-832 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to compare incidences and patterns of injury for female and male elite teams when playing football on artificial turf and grass. Twenty teams (15 male, 5 female) playing home matches on third-generation artificial turf were followed prospectively; their injury risk when playing on artificial turf pitches was compared with the risk when playing on grass. Individual exposure, injuries (time loss) and injury severity were recorded by the team medical staff. In total, 2105 injuries were recorded during 246 000 h of exposure to football. Seventy-one percent of the injuries were traumatic and 29% overuse injuries. There were no significant differences in the nature of overuse injuries recorded on artificial turf and grass for either men or women. The incidence (injuries/1000 player-hours) of acute (traumatic) injuries did not differ significantly between artificial turf and grass, for men (match 22.4 v 21.7; RR 1.0 (95% CI 0.9–1.2); training 3.5 v 3.5; RR 1.0 (0.8–1.2)) or women [match 14.9 v 12.5; RR 1.2 (0.8–1.8); training 2.9 v 2.8; RR 1.0 (0.6–1.7)]. During matches, men were less likely to sustain a quadriceps strain (P=0.031) and more likely to sustain an ankle sprain (P=0.040) on artificial turf.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2011. Vol. 21, no 6, 824-832 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67089DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2010.01118.xISI: 000297985400069OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-67089DiVA: diva2:407144
Note
Funding agencies|UEFA||Swedish Centre for Research in Sports||Praktikertjanst AB||Available from: 2011-03-29 Created: 2011-03-29 Last updated: 2013-09-04

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Ekstrand, JanHägglund, Martin
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