Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
The Genus Amomum (Zingiberaceae) in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam: Taxonomy and Ethnobotany, with Special Emphasis on Women's Health
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. (Systematic Botany)
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The species of Amomum Roxb. (Zingiberaceae) in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam are revised. Thirty-five species and two varieties are recognised, all names are typified, and detailed descriptions and a key are provided. Nine new species are described and one species is validated. Whilst revising Amomum for the Flore du Cambodge, du Laos et du Viêtnam, we have proposed to conserve the name Amomum villosum Lour. with a recent collection from Laos, which was not included in the protologue, as its type. Our research on the use of Amomum focuses on the use of plants during pregnancy, parturition, postpartum recovery and infant healthcare among three ethnic groups, the Brou, Saek and Kry. The investigations aim to identify culturally important traditions that may facilitate implementation of culturally appropriate healthcare. Data were collected in Khammouane province, Lao PDR, through group and individual interviews with women by female interviewers. More than 55 plant species are used in women's healthcare, of which > 90 % are used in postpartum recovery. This wealth of novel insights into plant use and preparation will help to understand culturally important practices such as confinement, dietary restrictions, mother roasting and herbal steam baths and their incorporation into modern healthcare. Through chemical analyses of Amomum we have recorded compounds with antimicrobial, analgesic and sedative effects that point to an empirical development of the traditional treatments around childbirth. Essential oils of three species used in hotbed and mother roasting, Amomum villosum Lour. Amomum microcarpum C.F.Liang & D.Fang and Blumea balsamifera (L.) DC. were found to contain significant amounts of the following terpenes: b-pinene, camphor, bornylacetate, borneol, linalool, D-limonene, fenchone, terpinen-4-ol and a-terpinene.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2011. , 40 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 824
Keyword [en]
Amomum, Zingiberaceae, Flore du Cambodge du Laos et du Vietnam, Taxonomy, Ethnobotany, Postpartum, Mother roasting, Hotbed, Brou, Saek, Kry, Lao PDR
National Category
Microbiology Biological Systematics
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Systematics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-149990ISBN: 978-91-554-8073-8OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-149990DiVA: diva2:406134
Public defence
2011-05-20, Zootissalen, Evoultionsmuseet (Museum of Evolution), Villavägen 9, Uppsala, 14:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-04-21 Created: 2011-03-24 Last updated: 2012-05-03
List of papers
1. A revision of Amomum (Zingiberaceae) in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A revision of Amomum (Zingiberaceae) in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam
2012 (English)In: Edinburgh journal of botany, ISSN 0960-4286, E-ISSN 1474-0036, Vol. 69, no 1, 99-206 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The species of Amomum Roxb. (Zingiberaceae) in Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam are revised. Thirty-five species and two varieties are recognised, most names are typified, and detailed descriptions and akey are provided. Conservation assessments of all species are given. Eleven new species are described:Amomum calcaratum Lamxay & M. F. Newman, Amomum calcicolum Lamxay & M. F. Newman, Amomumcelsum Lamxay & M. F. Newman, Amomum chevalieri Gagnep. ex Lamxay, Amomum chryseum Lamxay & M. F. Newman, Amomum glabrifolium Lamxay & M. F. Newman, Amomum plicatum Lamxay & M. F. Newman,Amomum prionocarpum Lamxay & M. F. Newman, Amomum rubidum Lamxay & N.S. Ly, Amomumstephanocoleum Lamxay & M. F. Newman and Amomum tenellum Lamxay & M. F. Newman.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-149967 (URN)10.1017/S0960428611000436 (DOI)
Note

Web of Knowledge: BCI:BCI201200227239

Available from: 2011-03-24 Created: 2011-03-24 Last updated: 2013-03-07Bibliographically approved
2. Proposal to conserve Amomum villosum (Zingiberaceae) with a conserved type
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proposal to conserve Amomum villosum (Zingiberaceae) with a conserved type
2011 (English)In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, Vol. 60, no 2, 596-598 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-149970 (URN)
Available from: 2011-03-24 Created: 2011-03-24 Last updated: 2013-02-28Bibliographically approved
3. Plants used during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum healthcare in Lao PDR: A comparative study of the Brou, Saek and Kry ethnic groups
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plants used during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum healthcare in Lao PDR: A comparative study of the Brou, Saek and Kry ethnic groups
2009 (English)In: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, ISSN 1746-4269, Vol. 5, 25- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

In many Southeast Asian cultures the activities and diet during the postpartum period are culturally dictated and a period of confinement is observed. Plants play an important role in recovery during the postpartum period in diet, traditional medicine, steam bath and mother roasting (where mother and child placed on a bed above a brazier with charcoal embers on which aromatic plants are laid). This research focuses on the use of plants during pregnancy, parturition, postpartum recovery and infant healthcare among three ethnic groups, the Brou, Saek and Kry. It aims to identify culturally important traditions that may facilitate implementation of culturally appropriate healthcare.

Methods

Data were collected in 10 different villages in Khammouane province, Lao PDR, through group and individual interviews with women by female interviewers.

Results

A total of 55 different plant species are used in women's healthcare, of which over 90% are used in postpartum recovery. Consensus Analysis rejects the hypothesis that the three ethnic groups belong to a single culture for postpartum plant use, and multidimensional scaling reveals non-overlapping clusters per ethnic group.

Conclusion

Medicinal plant use is common among the Brou, Saek and Kry to facilitate childbirth, alleviate menstruation problems, assist recovery after miscarriage, mitigate postpartum haemorrhage, aid postpartum recovery, and for use in infant care. The wealth of novel insights into plant use and preparation will help to understand culturally important practices such as confinement, dietary restrictions, mother roasting and herbal steam baths and their incorporation into modern healthcare

National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Systematic Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-141785 (URN)10.1186/1746-4269-5-25 (DOI)000207918700025 ()19737413 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-01-12 Created: 2011-01-12 Last updated: 2015-08-17Bibliographically approved
4. Traditions and plant use during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum recovery by the Kry ethnic group in Lao PDR
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traditions and plant use during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum recovery by the Kry ethnic group in Lao PDR
2011 (English)In: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, ISSN 1746-4269, Vol. 7, 14- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Activities and diet during the postpartum period are culturally dictated in many Southeast Asian cultures, and a period of confinement is observed. Plants play an important role in recovery during the postpartum period in diet and traditional medicine. Little is known of the Kry, a small ethnic group whose language was recently described, concerning its traditions and use of plants during pregnancy, parturition, postpartum recovery and infant healthcare. This research aims to study those traditions and identify medicinal plant use. Methods: Data were collected in the 3 different Kry villages in Khammouane province, Lao PDR, through group and individual interviews with women by female interviewers. Results: A total of 49 different plant species are used in women's healthcare. Plant use is culturally different from the neighboring Brou and Saek ethnic groups. Menstruation, delivery and postpartum recovery take place in separate, purpose-built, huts and a complex system of spatial restrictions is observed. Conclusions: Traditions surrounding childbirth are diverse and have been strictly observed, but are undergoing a shift towards those from neighboring ethnic groups, the Brou and Saek. Medicinal plant use to facilitate childbirth, alleviate menstruation problems, assist recovery after miscarriage, mitigate postpartum haemorrhage, aid postpartum recovery, and for use in infant care, is more common than previously reported (49 species instead of 14). The wealth of novel insights into plant use and preparation will help to understand culturally important practices such as traditional delivery, spatial taboos, confinement and dietary restrictions, and their potential in modern healthcare.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-156106 (URN)10.1186/1746-4269-7-14 (DOI)000291981800001 ()
Available from: 2011-07-11 Created: 2011-07-11 Last updated: 2012-05-03Bibliographically approved
5. Steam sauna and mother roasting in Lao PDR: Practices and Chemical constituents of essential oils of plant species used in postpartum recovery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Steam sauna and mother roasting in Lao PDR: Practices and Chemical constituents of essential oils of plant species used in postpartum recovery
2011 (English)In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 11, 128- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Fundamental in traditional postpartum recovery in Lao PDR is the use of hotbeds, mother roasting, steam sauna and steam baths. During these treatments medicinal plants play a crucial role, but little has been published about how the treatments are carried out precisely, which species are used, the medicinal properties of these species, and the medicinal efficacy of their chemical constituents.

Methods: Sixty-five interviews, in 15 rural villages, with women of 4 different ethnic groups were conducted to survey confinement rituals, and postpartum plant use and salience. Essential oils from the main species used were extracted using steam distillation and the main chemical constituents characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

Results: A total of 10 different species were used by three or more of the ethnic groups included in this study. All species were used in steam sauna and bath, but only 3 species were used in hotbed and mother roasting. Essential oils of Amomum villosum, Amomum microcarpum and Blumea balsamifera were found to contain significant amounts of the following terpenes: β-pinene, camphor, bornyl acetate, borneol, linalool, D-limonene, fenchone, terpinen-4-ol and α-terpinene.

Conclusions: Many of these terpenes have documented antimicrobial and analgesic properties, and some have also synergistic interactions with other terpenes. The mode of application in hotbed and mother roasting differs from the documented mechanisms of action of these terpenes. Plants in these two practices are likely to serve mainly hygienic purposes, by segregating the mother from infection sources such as beds, mats, stools, cloth and towels. Steam sauna medicinal plant use through inhalation of essential oils vapors can possibly have medicinal efficacy, but is unlikely to alleviate the ailments commonly encountered during postpartum convalescence. Steam sauna medicinal plant use through dermal condensation of essential oils, and steam bath cleansing of the perineal area is possibly a pragmatic use of the reported medicinal plants, as terpene constituents have documented antimicrobial, analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-149972 (URN)10.1186/1472-6882-11-128 (DOI)000299843900001 ()
Available from: 2011-03-24 Created: 2011-03-24 Last updated: 2012-03-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(23419 kB)3470 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 23419 kBChecksum SHA-512
909a145b26e7a85d7489ff1f95ebf2ce81973066bf3ba2f53406db2eeaad015934bc5cf0df3e4cffff83d2e007d10221d4839f511ab40adb3e0902a995a10612
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf
Buy this publication >>

By organisation
Systematic Biology
MicrobiologyBiological Systematics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 3470 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 679 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link