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Patients’ independence of a nurse for the administration of subcutaneous anti-TNF therapy: A phenomenographic study
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
2010 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 5146-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rheumatology nursing supports patients to manage their lives and live as independently as possible without pain, stiffness and functional restrictions. When conventional drugs fail to delay the development of the rheumatic disease, the patient may require biological treatment such as self-administered subcutaneous anti-TNF therapy. It is therefore important that the patient perspective focuses on the life-changing situation caused by the administration of regular subcutaneous injections. The aim of this study was to describe variations in how patients with rheumatic diseases experience their independence of a nurse for administration of subcutaneous anti-TNF therapy. The study had a descriptive, qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach and was carried out by means of 20 interviews. Four ways of understanding the patients’ experience of their subcutaneous anti-TNF therapy and independence of a nurse emerged: The struggling patient; The learning patient; The participating patient; The independent patient. Achieving independence of a nurse for subcutaneous anti-TNF injections can be understood by the patients in different ways. In their strive for independence, patients progress by learning about and participating in drug treatment, after which they experience that the injections make them independent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 5, no 2, p. 5146-
Keywords [en]
independence, patient, phenomenography, rheumatology nurse, self-administration, subcutaneous anti-TNF therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-12880DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v5i2.5146OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-12880DiVA, id: diva2:343636
Available from: 2010-08-16 Created: 2010-08-15 Last updated: 2013-04-16Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Person-centred care in rheumatology nursing in patients undergoing biological therapy: An explorative and interventional study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Person-centred care in rheumatology nursing in patients undergoing biological therapy: An explorative and interventional study
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: The overall aim was to explore and evaluate rheumatology nursing from a person-centred care perspective in patients undergoing biological therapy.

Methods: This thesis focuses on patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA) who were undergoing biological therapy at a rheumatology clinic in Sweden. Papers I and II had an explorative descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach. The 40 participants were interviewed about their dependence on or independence of a nurse for the administration of their infusions or injections. Paper III had a randomized controlled design involving 107 patients in the trial. The objective of the intervention was to replace every second monitoring visit at a rheumatologist-led clinic by a visit to a nurse-led rheumatology clinic, based on person-centred care. Paper IV had an explorative descriptive design with a qualitative content analysis approach. Interviews were conducted with 20 participants who attended the nurse-led rheumatology clinic.

Findings: Dependence on a rheumatology nurse for administration of intravenous infusions was described as invigorating due to the regular contact with the nurse, which provided security and involvement (paper I). Independence of a nurse for subcutaneous injections was understood by the patients in different ways and was achieved by struggling to cope with injecting themselves, learning about and participating in drug treatment (paper II). Patients with stable CIA receiving biological therapy were monitored by a nurse-led rheumatology clinic without any difference in outcome when compared to monitoring carried out at a rheumatologist-led clinic, as measured by the Disease Activity Score 28. Replacing one of the two annual rheumatologist outpatient follow-up visits by a visit to a nurse-led clinic for the monitoring of biological therapy was found to be safe and effective (paper III). A nurse-led rheumatology clinic, based on person-centred care, added value to the follow-up care of patients with stable CIA undergoing biological therapy by providing a sense of security, familiarity and participation (paper IV).

Conclusions: This thesis contributes a valuable insight into person-centred care as the core of rheumatology nursing in the area of biological therapy. The rheumatology nurse adds value to patient care when she/he gives patients an opportunity to talk about themselves as a person and allow their illness narrative to constitute a starting point for building collaboration, which encourages and empowers patients to be an active part in their biological therapy and become autonomous. A nurse who provides person-centred care and keeps the patients’ resources and needs in focus serves as an important guide during their healthcare journey.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: Publisher: School of Health Sciences, 2013. p. 87
Series
Hälsohögskolans avhandlingsserie, ISSN 1654-3602 ; 41
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-20924 (URN)978-91-85835-40-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-05-17, Forum Humanum, Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-04-16 Created: 2013-04-10 Last updated: 2013-05-03Bibliographically approved

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