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Onomatopoeic phrasal verbs: A corpus study of their meanings and usage in American English
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
2010 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This study examines how the meanings of onomatopoeic phrasal verbs are created and in which register these verbs are most frequently used. Through the study of previous research on the subject qualities of onomatopoeia and phrasal verbs are identified. Based on this a framework for identifying phrasal verbs and categorizing the meanings of onomatopoeic verbs and particles was created. Using the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA), a study of concordance lines and frequency in different registers was carried out on 50 onomatopoeic phrasal verbs. These verbs were constructed from ten mono-syllabic onomatopoeic verbs and three opposite pairs of spatial adverbs. The study found that several metaphorical meanings of the onomatopoeic verbs examined were not listed in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). The meanings of the particles were strongly linked to metaphorical structures.The conclusion of this study was that onomatopoeic verbs possess a flexibility that allows them to create a variety of different meanings. Furthermore, the types of meaning can be categorized after a pattern, although this pattern is often not found in the dictionary. The onomatopoeic phrasal verbs studied were most frequent in the fiction register, more so than other phrasal verbs. Understanding of the metaphorical nature of particles such as up and down is imperative to understand how the meaning of a phrasal verb is created. This should be taken into consideration when teaching English as a second language or creating a dictionary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. , p. 31
Keywords [en]
Compositionality, corpus study, figurative meaning, extension of meaning, meaning, metaphors, onomatopoeia, ontological metaphors, orientational metaphors, phrasal verbs, registers, semantic
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URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-6360OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-6360DiVA, id: diva2:325545
Presentation
2010-06-08, 12:30 (English)
Uppsok
Humanities, Theology
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Available from: 2010-07-09 Created: 2010-06-18 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf