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Female polymorphism, frequency dependence, and rapid evolutionary dynamics in natural populations
Lund University.
Lund University.
Lund University.
2005 (English)In: American Naturalist, ISSN 0003-0147, E-ISSN 1537-5323, Vol. 165, no 5, p. 567-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rapid evolutionary change over a few generations has been documented in natural populations. Such changes are observed as organisms invade new environments, and they are often triggered by changed interspecific interactions, such as differences in predation regimes. However, in spite of increased recognition of antagonistic male-female mating interactions, there is very limited evidence that such intraspecific interactions could cause rapid evolutionary dynamics in nature. This is because ecological and longitudinal data from natural populations have been lacking. Here we show that in a color-polymorphic damselfly species, male-female mating interactions lead to rapid evolutionary change in morph frequencies between generations. Field data and computer simulations indicate that these changes are driven by sexual conflict, in which morph fecundities are negatively affected by frequency- and density-dependent male mating harassment. These frequency-dependent processes prevent population divergence by maintaining a female polymorphism in most populations. Although these results contrast with the traditional view of how sexual conflict enhances the rate of population divergence, they are consistent with a recent theoretical model of how females may form discrete genetic clusters in response to male mating harassment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 165, no 5, p. 567-76
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-125975DOI: 10.1086/429278PubMedID: 15795853OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-125975DiVA, id: diva2:321564
Available from: 2010-06-02 Created: 2010-06-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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