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Bird-parasite interactions: Using Sindbis virus as a model system
Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology.
2000 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis focuses on the evolutionary interactions between birds and a parasite, the mosquito-borne Sindbis virus (Togaviridae, Alphavirus). In conclusion, the results show that the Sindbis virus is widespread among birds, and that the fitness of infected hosts may be reduced by the virus. Furthermore, viruclearance ability was revealed by male plumage traits, and viraemia was related to hormonal- and social status.

The distribution of Sindbis virus infections among passerine birds was examined in five areas in Sweden. Almost all species tested were infected, and three species of thrushes weridentified as the main hosts. In a series of experimental infections, greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) kept in aviaries were used ahosts. First, the behavioural consequences of an infection were investigated. During the infection, birds tended to reduce thespontaneous locomotion activity, and when escaping from a simulated predator attack, infected birds had reduced take-off spee Furthermore, when comparing virus clearance rate between male greenfinches, I found that males with large yellow tail ornaments hafaster virus clearance rates as compared to those with smaller ornaments. Thus, male virus clearance ability was honestly revealed by the size of an ornament. Moreover, males with experimentally elevated testosterone levels experienced a delayed, but not increased viraemia as compared to controls. When the relationship between male social ranand viraemia was examined, I found no evidence that high-ranked males suffered reduced rank during the infection. Nevertheless, viraemipatterns of males were related to their social rank, so that low-ranked birds had a delayed viraemia as compared to high-ranked birds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2000. , p. 40
Series
Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1104-232X ; 557
Keywords [en]
Developmental biology, Carduelis chloris, Sindbis virus, host-parasite interaction, ornament, social dominance, testosterone, sexual selection
Keywords [sv]
Utvecklingsbiologi
National Category
Developmental Biology
Research subject
Population Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-486ISBN: 91-554-4773-2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-486DiVA, id: diva2:165972
Public defence
2000-09-22, Elias Friessalen, Evolutionsbiologiskt centrum, Uppsala, 15:00
Available from: 2000-09-01 Created: 2000-09-01Bibliographically approved

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