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Ecce Equus! Egalitära hästgemenskapers erkännande av hästen som subjekt
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
2020 (Swedish)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesisAlternative title
Ecce Equus! Egalitarian Equine Communities’ Acknowledgement of the Horse as Subject (English)
Abstract [en]

Within human animal studies (HAS), as well as within the posthumanistic field in general, it has been pointed out that we still lack knowledge of how animals can be recognized as subjects and agents with the possession of cognitive and social abilities. At the same time, we see a re-evaluation of the human anthropocentric boundary between Man and the Beast – in the academic world as well as in the practice of everyday life. One example is how the prevalent ways of relating to and handling with horses – our traditional equine cultures – are under transition. Norms, attitudes and practices – not least those relating to equestrian sports – are changing; some people even believe in a “paradigm shift”, while others predict a future “horse revolution”. This ethnological contribution to the field of HAS aims to study the acknowledgement of the horse as subject, how it is being expressed and practised by egalitarian communities within the Swedish horse society, and what the implications of that acknowledgement are, for both human and horse. Consisting of interviews and participant observations and seen through the lens of a phenomenological HAS-perspective, the empirical material shows that the egalitarian approach implies ethical and practical consequences. Not only does it entail considerations regarding such things as horse keeping, riding style, competitions, training and conditioning methods – for some individuals it may also implicate a personal change, as they discover the horse’s message of presence and authenticity

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. , p. 84
Keywords [en]
Horse-human relationship, Subject. Agency, Human-animal studies, Egalitarian communities, Zooanthropology, Posthumanism
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-181592OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-181592DiVA, id: diva2:1430312
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Examiners
Available from: 2020-05-15 Created: 2020-05-14 Last updated: 2020-05-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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