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Higher- and lower-order personality traits and cluster subtypes in social anxiety disorder.
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2020 (English)In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, no 4, article id e0232187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) can come in different forms, presenting problems for diagnostic classification. Here, we examined personality traits in a large sample of patients (N = 265) diagnosed with SAD in comparison to healthy controls (N = 164) by use of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) and Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP). In addition, we identified subtypes of SAD based on cluster analysis of the NEO-PI-R Big Five personality dimensions. Significant group differences in personality traits between patients and controls were noted on all Big Five dimensions except agreeableness. Group differences were further noted on most lower-order facets of NEO-PI-R, and nearly all KSP variables. A logistic regression analysis showed, however, that only neuroticism and extraversion remained significant independent predictors of patient/control group when controlling for the effects of the other Big Five dimensions. Also, only neuroticism and extraversion yielded large effect sizes when SAD patients were compared to Swedish normative data for the NEO-PI-R. A two-step cluster analysis resulted in three separate clusters labelled Prototypical (33%), Introvert-Conscientious (29%), and Instable-Open (38%) SAD. Individuals in the Prototypical cluster deviated most on the Big Five dimensions and they were at the most severe end in profile analyses of social anxiety, self-rated fear during public speaking, trait anxiety, and anxiety-related KSP variables. While additional studies are needed to determine if personality subtypes in SAD differ in etiological and treatment-related factors, the present results demonstrate considerable personality heterogeneity in socially anxious individuals, further underscoring that SAD is a multidimensional disorder.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 15, no 4, article id e0232187
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Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-39004DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0232187PubMedID: 32348331Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85084071651OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-39004DiVA, id: diva2:1429415
Available from: 2020-05-11 Created: 2020-05-11 Last updated: 2020-05-13

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Åhs, Fredrik
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Department of Psychology and Social Work
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf