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Project coordinators views on climate adaptation costs and benefits - justice implications
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5549-5897
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5500-3300
2020 (English)In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

As local climate adaptation activity increases, so does the number of questions about costs, benefits, financing and the role that economic considerations play in adaptation-related decision-making and policy. Through five cases, covering a range of climate risks and types of adaptation measures, this paper critically examines Swedish project coordinators perceptions of costs and benefits in already-implemented climate adaptation measures. Our study finds that project coordinators make use of different system boundaries - on temporal, geographical and administrative scales - in their cost/benefit evaluations, making the practice of determining adaptation costs arbitrary and hard to compare. We further demonstrate that the project coordinators interpret costs and benefits in a manner that downplays the intangible environmental and social costs and benefits arising from the adaptation measures, despite their own experience of how such measures negatively impact upon social value. The exclusion of social and environmental costs and benefits has severe implications for justice, as it can bias decisions against people and ecosystems that are affected negatively. Based on the findings, we propose three tentative social justice dilemmas in local climate adaptation planning and implementation: 1. Cost and benefit distribution across scales; 2. The identification and valuation of non-market effects; and 3. The equitable allocation of costs and benefits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD , 2020.
Keywords [en]
Climate adaptation; economic aspects; justice implications; co-benefits; maladaptation
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163412DOI: 10.1080/13549839.2020.1712340ISI: 000507016600001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-163412DiVA, id: diva2:1391382
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas [942-2015-106]

Available from: 2020-02-04 Created: 2020-02-04 Last updated: 2020-02-04

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Asplund, ThereseHjerpe, Mattias
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Tema Environmental ChangeFaculty of Arts and SciencesCentre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR
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