Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Effects of ink characteristics and piezo-electric inkjetting parameters on lysozyme activity
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2412-9004
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1008-1313
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4369-9304
2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 18252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
According to the author(s), the content of this publication falls within the area of sustainable development.
Abstract [en]

Inkjet printing of enzymes can facilitate many novel applications where a small amount of materials need to be deposited in a precise and flexible manner. However, maintaining the satisfactory activity of inkjet printed enzyme is a challenging task due to the requirements of ink rheology and printhead parameters. Thus to find optimum inkjetting conditions we studied the effects of several ink formulation and jetting parameters on lysozyme activity using a piezoelectric printhead. Within linear activity range of protein concentrations ink containing 50 µg/mL lysozyme showed a satisfactory activity retention of 85%. An acceptable activity of jetted ink was found at pH 6.2 and ionic strength of 0.06 molar. Glycerol was found to be an effective viscosity modifier (10–15 mPa.s), humectant and protein structure stabilizer for the prepared ink. A non-ionic surfactant when used just below critical micelle concentration was found to be favourable for the jetted inks. An increase in activity retention was observed for inks jetted after 24 hours of room temperature incubation. However, no additional activity was seen for inkjetting above the room temperature. Findings of this study would be useful for formulating other protein-based inks and setting their inkjet printing parameters without highly compromising the functionality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 9, no 18252
Keywords [en]
biological ink, lysozyme, inkjet printing, piezoelectric
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-22771DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-54723-9OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-22771DiVA, id: diva2:1391140
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2020-02-03

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full texthttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-54723-9#citeas

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Biswas, TuserYu, JunchunNierstrasz, Vincent
By organisation
Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business
In the same journal
Scientific Reports
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf