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Like an Oak Tree He Survived: An Analysis of Masculinity Norms in Post-War Namibia
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
2020 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

During the last decades, international organisations have worked hard to implement a gender awareness in their peace- and development programs. Many organizations, however, fail to include an awareness of masculinity construction, and gender has become synonymous with women. This is despite the fact that throughout history, key actors in armed conflicts have been men. Understanding how masculinity is constructed in relation to armed-conflicts can therefore be beneficial to achieve a lasting peace. Thus, the aim of this thesis is to examine how masculinity norms are expressed among Namibians after the Namibian war of independence, and how these norms have developed during the post-war era. By conducting a mixed-method of content and discourse analysis, this study investigates how the hegemonic masculinity is constructed by the citizens of Namibia through the “letters to the editor”-section in the national newspaper The Namibian. All letters published during 1991, 1992, 2002 and 2003 were analysed to achieve an understanding of how the masculinity norms had developed. The study found that the hegemonic masculinity in the earlier years consisted of a strong and honourable man, with a high education and the possibility to independently take care of his family. The hegemonic masculinity had in the later years developed into a more caring and compassionate man, who supported his working wife.  The study also found that some aspects of the hegemonic masculinity had remained the same, such as heterosexuality and monogamy. The study encourages further research on the development of masculinity norms in a post-conflict setting, and how these norms may hinder or encourage a lasting peace. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. , p. 43
Keywords [en]
Hegemonic masculinity, Namibia, Post-conflict
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-402760OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-402760DiVA, id: diva2:1386732
Subject / course
Development Studies
Educational program
Bachelor Programme in Peace and Development Studies
Supervisors
Available from: 2020-01-24 Created: 2020-01-19 Last updated: 2020-01-24Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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Language
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  • nn-NB
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Output format
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