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Many Meats and Many Milks?: The Ontological Politics of a Proposed Post-animal Revolution
Department of Human Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6468-2675
Lund University.
Lund University.
2019 (English)In: Science as Culture, ISSN 0950-5431, E-ISSN 1470-1189, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 70-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today plant-based alternatives to animal-agricultural products are made available or developed alongside ‘cultured’ meat, and products utilising genetic modification. To proponents, this signifies the emergence of ‘cellular agriculture’ as a food-production field or the possibility of a ‘post-animal bioeconomy’: a way to safely and sustainably produce animal products without animals. Drawing on previous work on ontological politics enables acknowledging how these novel objects unsettle animal products’ ontological stability, thereby offering a practical case of how the world is multiply produced. An important emphasis within this tradition is the situated nature of reality-making practices. Consequently our analysis, focusing on different practices, sites and objects compared to influential studies of ontological politics, necessitates bringing in hitherto relatively unexplored political-economic relations and legal processes. As global processes and problem formulations, laboratories, and national or regional regulations come together to remake realities the ontological-political dynamics determining the fate of cellular agriculture or a post-animal bioeconomy becomes shaped by a combination of conflicts and budding collaborations between proponents of new technologies and established livestock interests. Understanding these dynamics requires tracing both how post-animal products reshape the world they are introduced into, and acknowledging the friction evident as reality-carrying objects leave their laboratories.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 28, no 1, p. 70-97
Keywords [en]
Meat, milk, biotechnology, ontological politics, food
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400213DOI: 10.1080/09505431.2018.1544232ISI: 000458405300004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-400213DiVA, id: diva2:1380608
Projects
Formas 2013:1510: Bypassing the beast: Exploring the political ecology of in vitro meatAvailable from: 2019-12-19 Created: 2019-12-19 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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  • de-DE
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