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Benefits of higher resistance-training volume are related to ribosome biogenesis.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group. Section for Health and Exercise Physiology, Department of Public Health and Sport Sciences, Inland Norway.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8360-2100
Section for Health and Exercise Physiology, Department of Public Health and Sport Sciences, Inland Norway.
Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway.
Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway.
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0022-3751, E-ISSN 1469-7793, Vol. 598, no 3, p. 543-565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

KEY POINTS: For individuals showing suboptimal adaptations to resistance training, manipulation of training volume is a potential measure to facilitate responses. This remains unexplored. Here, 34 untrained individuals performed contralateral resistance training with moderate and low volume for 12 weeks. Moderate volume led to larger increases in muscle cross-sectional area, strength and type II fibre-type transitions. These changes coincided with greater activation of signalling pathways controlling muscle growth and greater induction of ribosome synthesis. Thirteen and sixteen participants, respectively, displayed clear benefits of moderate-volume training on muscle hypertrophy and strength. This coincided with greater total RNA accumulation in the early-phase of the training period, suggesting that ribosomal biogenesis regulates the dose-response relationship between training volume and muscle hypertrophy. These results demonstrate that there is a dose-dependent relationship between training volume and outcomes. On the individual level, benefits of higher training volume were associated with increased ribosomal biogenesis.

ABSTRACT: Resistance-exercise volume is a determinant of training outcomes. However not all individuals respond in a dose-dependent fashion. In this study, 34 healthy individuals (males n = 16, 23.6 (4.1) years; females n = 18, 22.0 (1.3)) performed moderate- (3 sets per exercise, MOD) and low-volume (1 set, LOW) resistance training in a contralateral fashion for 12 weeks (2-3 sessions × week-1 ). Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and strength were assessed at weeks 0 and 12, along with biopsy sampling (m. Vastus lateralis). Muscle biopsies were also sampled before and one hour after the fifth session (Week 2). MOD resulted in larger increases in muscle CSA (5.2 (3.8)% versus 3.7 (3.7)%, P < 0.001) and strength (3.4-7.7% difference, all P < 0.05. This coincided with greater reductions in type IIX fibres from week 0 to 12 (MOD, -4.6; LOW -3.2%-point), greater phosphorylation of S6-kinase 1 (p85 S6K1Thr412 , 19%; p70 S6K1Thr389 , 58%) and ribosomal protein S6Ser235/236 (37%), greater rested-state total RNA (8.8%) and greater exercise-induced c-Myc mRNA expression (25%; Week 2, all P < 0.05). Thirteen and sixteen participants, respectively, displayed clear benefits in response to MOD on muscle hypertrophy and strength. Benefits were associated with greater accumulation of total RNA at Week 2 in the MOD leg, with every 1% difference increasing the odds of MOD benefit by 7.0% (P = 0.005) and 9.8% (P = 0.002). In conclusion, MOD led to greater functional and biological adaptations than LOW. Associations between dose-dependent total RNA accumulation and increases in muscle mass and strength points to ribosome biogenesis as a determinant of dose-dependent training responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020. Vol. 598, no 3, p. 543-565
National Category
Physiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5958DOI: 10.1113/JP278455PubMedID: 31813190OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-5958DiVA, id: diva2:1380141
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved

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