Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Exploring the role of risk perception in influencing flood losses over time
Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden; Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Political Science Section, Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan. Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden; Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden; Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
2020 (English)In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What implications do societies’ risk perceptions have for flood losses? This study uses a stylized, socio-hydrological model to simulate the mutual feedbacks between human societies and flood events. It integrates hydrological modelling with cultural theory and proposes four ideal types of society that reflect existing dominant risk perception and management: risk neglecting, risk monitoring, risk downplaying and risk controlling societies. We explore the consequent trajectories of flood risk generated by the interactions between floods and people for these ideal types of society over time. The results suggest that flood losses are substantially reduced when awareness-raising attitudes are promoted through inclusive, participatory approaches in the community. In contrast, societies that rely on top-down hierarchies and structural measures to protect settlements on floodplains may still suffer significant losses during extreme events. This study illustrates how predictions formed through social science theories can be applied and tested in hydrological modelling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020. Vol. 65, no 1, p. 12-20
Keywords [en]
flood risk, socio-hydrology, resilience, risk awareness, cultural theory
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Statsvetenskap med inriktning mot krishantering och internationell samverkan
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:fhs:diva-8857DOI: 10.1080/02626667.2019.1677907OAI: oai:DiVA.org:fhs-8857DiVA, id: diva2:1377401
Available from: 2019-12-11 Created: 2019-12-11 Last updated: 2019-12-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1465 kB)3 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1465 kBChecksum SHA-512
32cabcbc6a673db0f313f7cfb1c730adad2f23b81c59b8c83206d3708302d74bf7e26ef48091a0aa383c5e2378d76db01c019274ba1a9fb8a86d710e6c4c06fd
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Albrecht, Frederike
By organisation
Sektionen för krishantering och internationell samverkan
In the same journal
Hydrological Sciences Journal
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 3 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 9 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf