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Secretor Status is Associated with Susceptibility to Disease in a Large GII.6 Norovirus Foodborne Outbreak
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2019 (English)In: Food and Environmnetal Virology, ISSN 1867-0334, E-ISSN 1867-0342Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Norovirus is commonly associated with food and waterborne outbreaks. Genetic susceptibility to norovirus is largely dependent on presence of histo-blood group antigens (HBGA), specifically ABO, secretor, and Lewis phenotypes. The aim of the study was to determine the association between HBGAs to norovirus susceptibility during a large norovirus foodborne outbreak linked to genotype GII.6 in an office-based company in Stockholm, Sweden, 2015. A two-episode outbreak with symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting occurred in 2015. An online questionnaire was sent to all 1109 employees that had worked during the first outbreak episode. Food and water samples were collected from in-house restaurant and tested for bacterial and viral pathogens. In addition, fecal samples were collected from 8 employees that had diarrhea. To investigate genetic susceptibility during the outbreak, 98 saliva samples were analyzed for ABO, secretor, and Lewis phenotypes using ELISA. A total of 542 of 1109 (49%) employees reported gastrointestinal symptoms. All 8 fecal samples tested positive for GII norovirus, which was also detected in coleslaw collected from the in-house restaurant. Eating at the in-house restaurant was significantly associated with risk of symptom development. Nucleotide sequencing was successful for 5/8 fecal samples and all belonged to the GII.6 genotype. HBGA characterization showed a strong secretor association to norovirus-related symptoms (P = 0.014). No association between norovirus disease and ABO phenotypes was observed. The result of this study shows that non-secretors were significantly less likely to report symptoms in a large foodborne outbreak linked to the emerging GII.6 norovirus strain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019.
Keywords [en]
Norovirus, Outbreak, Host genetics, Histo-blood group antigens, GII.6
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165475DOI: 10.1007/s12560-019-09410-3ISI: 000493266400001PubMedID: 31664650OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-165475DiVA, id: diva2:1375373
Available from: 2019-12-04 Created: 2019-12-04 Last updated: 2019-12-04

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Widerström, MicaelNordgren, Johan
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