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High single-cell diversity in carbon and nitrogen assimilations by a chain-forming diatom across a century
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Summary Almost a century ago Redfield discovered a relatively constant ratio between carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in particulate organic matter and nitrogen and phosphorus of dissolved nutrients in seawater. Since then, the riverine export of nitrogen to the ocean has increased 20 fold. High abundance of resting stages in sediment layers dated more than a century back indicate that the common planktonic diatom Skeletonema marinoi has endured this eutrophication. We germinated unique genotypes from resting stages originating from isotope-dated sediment layers (15 and 80 years old) in a eutrophied fjord. Using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) combined with stable isotopic tracers, we show that the cell-specific carbon and nitrogen assimilation rates vary by an order of magnitude on a single-cell level but are significantly correlated during the exponential growth phase, resulting in constant assimilation quota in cells with identical genotypes. The assimilation quota varies largely between different clones independent of age. We hypothesize that the success of S. marinoi in coastal waters may be explained by its high diversity of nutrient demand not only at a clone-specific level but also at the single-cell level, whereby the population can sustain and adapt to dynamic nutrient conditions in the environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111) , 2019. Vol. 21, no 1, p. 142-151
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Ecosystems and species history
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-3515DOI: 10.1111/1462-2920.14434OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-3515DiVA, id: diva2:1375034
Conference
2019/12/03
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2019-12-03Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.14434

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Whitehouse, Martin J.
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