Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Untangling hidden nutrient dynamics: rapid ammonium cycling and single-cell ammonium assimilation in marine plankton communities
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology. (Nordsim)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2227-577X
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 1960-1974Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ammonium is a central nutrient in aquatic systems. Yet, cell-specific ammonium assimilation among diverse functional plankton is poorly documented in field communities. Combining stable-isotope incubations (15N-ammonium, 15N2 and 13C-bicarbonate) with secondary-ion mass spectrometry, we quantified bulk ammonium dynamics, N2-fixation and carbon (C) fixation, as well as single-cell ammonium assimilation and C-fixation within plankton communities in nitrogen (N)-depleted surface waters during summer in the Baltic Sea. Ammonium production resulted from regenerated (≥91%) and new production (N2-fixation, ≤9%), supporting primary production by 78–97 and 2–16%, respectively. Ammonium was produced and consumed at balanced rates, and rapidly recycled within 1 h, as shown previously, facilitating an efficient ammonium transfer within plankton communities. N2-fixing cyanobacteria poorly assimilated ammonium, whereas heterotrophic bacteria and picocyanobacteria accounted for its highest consumption (~20 and ~20–40%, respectively). Surprisingly, ammonium assimilation and C-fixation were similarly fast for picocyanobacteria (non-N2-fixing Synechococcus) and large diatoms (Chaetoceros). Yet, the population biomass was high for Synechococcus but low for Chaetoceros. Hence, autotrophic picocyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria, with their high single-cell assimilation rates and dominating population biomass, competed for the same nutrient source and drove rapid ammonium dynamics in N-depleted marine waters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 13, no 8, p. 1960-1974
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecosystems and species history
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-3514DOI: 10.1038/s41396-019-0386-zOAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-3514DiVA, id: diva2:1375029
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2019-12-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2085 kB)1 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 2085 kBChecksum SHA-512
42d6b7c93108cf57c73c931d245155ce3ecd07301ff00bce3a468961c31aed1b5f49880d9406f70f7e7924538d45761252916291114b083f13ca524be9f1d101
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full texthttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41396-019-0386-z

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Whitehouse, Martin J.
By organisation
Department of Geology
In the same journal
The ISME Journal
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 1 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 1 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf