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Substantial vegetation response to Early Jurassicglobal warming with impacts on oceanic anoxia
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1766-3516
The Natural History Museum, London.
Università degli Studi di Firenze.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2987-5559
2019 (English)In: Nature Geoscience, ISSN 1752-0894, E-ISSN 1752-0908, Vol. 12, p. 462-467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rapid global warming and oceanic oxygen deficiency during the Early Jurassic Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event at around 183 Ma is associated with a major turnover of marine biota linked to volcanic activity. The impact of the event on land-based ecosystems and the processes that led to oceanic anoxia remain poorly understood. Here we present analyses of spore–pollen assemblages from Pliensbachian–Toarcian rock samples that record marked changes on land during the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. Vegetation shifted from a high-diversity mixture of conifers, seed ferns, wet-adapted ferns and lycophytes to a low-diversity assemblage dominated by cheirolepid conifers, cycads and Cerebropollenites-producers, which were able to survive in warm, drought-like conditions. Despite the rapid recovery of floras after Toarcian global warming, the overall community composition remained notably different after the event. In shelf seas, eutrophication continued throughout the Toarcian event. This is reflected in the overwhelming dominance of algae, which contributed to reduced oxygen conditions and to a marked decline in dinoflagellates. The substantial initial vegetation response across the Pliensbachian/Toarcian boundary compared with the relatively minor marine response highlights that the impacts of the early stages of volcanogenic global warming were more severe for continental ecosystems than marine ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, 2019. Vol. 12, p. 462-467
Keywords [en]
Atmospheric CO2, Toarcian, Pliensbachian, Anoxia, Mass extinction
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
The changing Earth
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-3420DOI: 10.1038/s41561-019-0349-zOAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-3420DiVA, id: diva2:1372940
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 015-04264NERC - the Natural Environment Research Council, NE/I005641/1Wenner-Gren Foundations, UPD2017-0155Available from: 2019-08-01 Created: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-019-0349-z

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