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Dominance relationships and coalitionary aggression against conspecifics in female carrion crows
Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Biol, Div Evolutionary Biol, Planegg Martinsried, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Biol, Behav Ecol Grp, Planegg Martinsried, Germany.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 15922Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cooperation is a prevailing feature of many animal systems. Coalitionary aggression, where a group of individuals engages in coordinated behaviour to the detriment of conspecific targets, is a form of cooperation involving complex social interactions. To date, evidence has been dominated by studies in humans and other primates with a clear bias towards studies of male-male coalitions. We here characterize coalitionary aggression behaviour in a group of female carrion crows consisting of recruitment, coordinated chase, and attack. The individual of highest social rank liaised with the second most dominant individual to engage in coordinated chase and attack of a lower ranked crow on several occasions. Despite active intervention by the third most highly ranked individual opposing the offenders, the attack finally resulted in the death of the victim. All individuals were unrelated, of the same sex, and naive to the behaviour excluding kinship, reproduction, and social learning as possible drivers. Instead, the coalition may reflect a strategy of the dominant individual to secure long-term social benefits. Overall, the study provides evidence that members of the crow family engage in coordinated alliances directed against conspecifics as a possible means to manipulate their social environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 9, article id 15922
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Behavioral Sciences Biology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397632DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-52177-7ISI: 000493898100030PubMedID: 31685854OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-397632DiVA, id: diva2:1372246
Available from: 2019-11-22 Created: 2019-11-22 Last updated: 2019-11-22Bibliographically approved

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