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Trajectories of effort-reward imbalance in Swedish workers: Differences in demographic and work-related factors and associations with health
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8433-2405
Uppsala University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4921-4865
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. (Work and Organizational Psychology)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8683-115X
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3578-5824
2019 (English)In: Work & Stress, ISSN 0267-8373, E-ISSN 1464-5335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to identify trajectories of effort-reward imbalance (ERI), to examine these with respect to demographic (age, gender, socio-economic position) and work-related (employment contract, work hours, shift work, sector) factors, and to investigate associations with different health indicators (self-rated health, depressive symptoms, migraine, sickness absence). The study used four waves of data (N = 6702), collected biennially within the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). Using latent class growth modelling, we identified four trajectories: a stable low imbalance trajectory, which comprised 90% of all participants, and three change trajectories including a decreasing trajectory (4% of the participants), an inverted U-shaped trajectory and an increasing imbalance trajectory, both in 3% of the participants. Results indicate that a sizeable proportion of Swedish employees’ experience imbalance between efforts and rewards at work. The most favourable trajectory comprised relatively more men and was characterised by better work-related characteristics than the less favourable ERI trajectories. All change trajectories were dominated by women and employees in the public sector. Health developments followed ERI trajectories, such that less favourable trajectories associated with impaired health and more favourable trajectories associated with better health. Sickness absence increased among all ERI trajectories, most so for the decreasing and increasing ERI trajectory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
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Social Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-175985DOI: 10.1080/02678373.2019.1666434OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-175985DiVA, id: diva2:1369792
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved

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Leineweber, ConstanzeEib, ConstanzeBernhard-Oettel, ClaudiaNyberg, Anna
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