Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Water Shortages and its Environmental Consequences within Tigris and Euphrates Rivers
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6790-2653
Consultant Engineer, Norrköping, Sweden.
University of Kurdistan, Hewler, KRG, Iraq. Private Consultant Geologist, Erbil, Iraq..
2019 (English)In: Journal of Earth Sciences and Geotechnical Engineering, ISSN 1792-9040, E-ISSN 1792-9660, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 27-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water shortage problem is an international issue where 80 countries of the third world supporting 40% of the world’s population suffer from water shortage problems. There are 1.2 billion people suffering physically from water shortage problems and 1.8 billion lack adequate sanitation. In addition, in the Third World, about 80% of illnesses and 30% of unnatural deaths are due to water disease and polluted water. Future expectations indicate that 37 countries in 2015 will be having water shortage problems. Iraq was an exception till the seventies due to the presence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. The flow of these rivers is decreasing due to climate change and building of dams within the upper parts of the catchments. Temperatures are increasing while rainfall is expected to decrease by (15-25%). This will cause reduction of surface water resources by (29-73%). As a consequence, groundwater resources will be depleted. Water shortage will lead to an increase in transpiration, reduction off arable land, decrease of natural vegetative cover, extended desertification, more dust storms and soil destruction. It is expected that Iraq in 2040 is expected to have -20.6 billion cubic meters shortage in its water requirements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UK: Scientific Press International Limited , 2019. Vol. 9, no 4, p. 27-56
Keywords [en]
Tigris River, Euphrates River, Water shortage, Environment, Iraq
National Category
Geotechnical Engineering
Research subject
Soil Mechanics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76683OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-76683DiVA, id: diva2:1369450
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 1;2019-11-18 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1633 kB)5 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1633 kBChecksum SHA-512
24915a3f285308105a4e5ffc613e44f641e0685d2e401f07f0bc1df0473bc99b5105c100a078198dfd9095ad79e7fc213e85f0891b10dd7881af10271e5895d8
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

https://www.scienpress.com/journal_focus.asp?main_id=59&Sub_id=IV&Issue=1389407

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Al-Ansari, Nadhir
By organisation
Mining and Geotechnical Engineering
In the same journal
Journal of Earth Sciences and Geotechnical Engineering
Geotechnical Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 5 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 17 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf