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Early career performance and its correlation with gender and publication output during doctoral education
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. (Inforsk)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3623-2471
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Umeå University Library. (Inforsk)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7653-4004
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. (Inforsk)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3388-6237
2020 (English)In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 309-330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Publishing in peer-reviewed journals as a part of the doctoral education is common practice in many countries. The publication output of doctoral students is increasingly used in selection processes for funding and employment in their early careers. Against the backdrop of this development, the aim of this study is to examine (1) how performance during the doctoral education affect the probability of attaining research excellence in the early career; and (2) if there is performance differences between males and females in the early career and to which degree these gender differences can be explained by performance differences during the doctoral education. The data consist of Swedish doctoral students employed at the faculty of science and technology and the faculty of medicine at a Swedish university. Our main conclusions are that (1) research performance during the doctoral education has a positive effect on attaining excellence in the early career; (2) there is an interaction between publication volume and excellence during doctoral education suggesting that a combination of quantity and quality in doctoral students’ performance is indicative of future excellence; (3) there are performance differences in the early career indicating that males have a higher probability of attaining excellence than females, and; (4) this difference is partly explained by performance differences during the doctoral education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020. Vol. 122, no 1, p. 309-330
Keywords [en]
Early career, Doctoral student, Excellence, Gender, Indicator, Bibliometrics, Performance, Prediction
National Category
Information Studies Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165082DOI: 10.1007/s11192-019-03262-1ISI: 000495348700008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85074815376OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-165082DiVA, id: diva2:1368974
Available from: 2019-11-09 Created: 2019-11-09 Last updated: 2020-02-03Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. In search of future excellence: bibliometric indicators, gender differences, and predicting research performance in the early career
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In search of future excellence: bibliometric indicators, gender differences, and predicting research performance in the early career
2020 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The governance of higher education institutions and science have endured significant changes during the last decades, emphasizing competitiveness, performance, and excellence. Embedded in this development is an increased use of bibliometric indicators as decision support tools in contexts of e.g., employment, appointment, and funding. These changes have gradually extended to the early career phase and the doctoral education.

The aim of this thesis is to make a contribution to an ongoing discussion about the predictability of research performance and the reasonability of using bibliometric indicators in the early career, with a focus on gender differences. The thesis revolves around three overarching research questions focusing the early career and the doctoral education: (1) the degree to which research performance, as operationalized with bibliometric indicators, is predictable; (2) the degree to which gender differences in early career performance can be explained by research performance during the doctoral education; and (3) to what degree factors such as collaboration and supervisor behaviour, might affect gender differences in research performance.

The main results suggests that research performance in the early career, as operationalized by bibliometric indicators, is predictable. Individuals who publish larger volumes, publish more in high prestige journals, and more excellent research early in their career, are more likely to attain excellence later on. The results also indicates that gender differences in performance can be observed as early asduring doctor education and that these differences partly explain the observed performance differences between males and females in the early career.

Finally, the results suggests that gender differences in performance during doctoral education can largely be explained by the doctoral student’s collaborative networks and supervisor behaviour. It is concluded that while research performance, as operationalized by bibliometric indicators, duringthe early career is predictable, there are gender differences in performance that have to be taken into consideration. If they are not, the use of these types of performance indicators in science policy and management might increase the gender gap in science.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2020. p. 60
Series
Akademiska avhandlingar vid Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, ISSN 1104-2508 ; 84
Keywords
bibliometric indicator, gender, early career, doctoral education, excellence, decision support tool, prediction, research performance, doctoral student
National Category
Information Studies Sociology Educational Sciences
Research subject
library and information science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167701 (URN)978-91-7855-208-5 (ISBN)978-91-7855-209-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2020-02-28, Hörsal N360, Naturvetarhuset, Umeå, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2020-02-07 Created: 2020-02-01 Last updated: 2020-02-18Bibliographically approved

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