Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sociohydrology: Scientific Challenges in Addressing the Sustainable Development Goals
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. CNDS, Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8180-4996
Univ Illinois, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Urbana, IL USA;Univ Illinois, Dept Geog & Geog Informat Sci, Urbana, IL USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3004-3530
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. CNDS, Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4513-3213
INRA, Agrocampus Ouest, UMR SAS, Rennes, France.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 6327-6355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations Agenda 2030 represent an ambitious blueprint to reduce inequalities globally and achieve a sustainable future for all mankind. Meeting the SDGs for water requires an integrated approach to managing and allocating water resources, by involving all actors and stakeholders, and considering how water resources link different sectors of society. To date, water management practice is dominated by technocratic, scenario-based approaches that may work well in the short term but can result in unintended consequences in the long term due to limited accounting of dynamic feedbacks between the natural, technical, and social dimensions of human-water systems. The discipline of sociohydrology has an important role to play in informing policy by developing a generalizable understanding of phenomena that arise from interactions between water and human systems. To explain these phenomena, sociohydrology must address several scientific challenges to strengthen the field and broaden its scope. These include engagement with social scientists to accommodate social heterogeneity, power relations, trust, cultural beliefs, and cognitive biases, which strongly influence the way in which people alter, and adapt to, changing hydrological regimes. It also requires development of new methods to formulate and test alternative hypotheses for the explanation of emergent phenomena generated by feedbacks between water and society. Advancing sociohydrology in these ways therefore represents a major contribution toward meeting the targets set by the SDGs, the societal grand challenge of our time. Plain Language Summary Water crises that humanity faces are increasingly connected and are growing in complexity. As such, they require a more integrated approach in managing water resources, which involves all actors and stakeholders and considers how water resources link different sectors of society. Yet, water management practice is still dominated by technocratic approaches, which emphasize technical solutions. While these approaches may work in the short-term, they often result in unintended consequences in the long-term. Sociohydrology is developing a generalizable understanding of the interactions and feedbacks between natural,technical and social processes, which can improve water management practice. As such, advancing sociohydrology can contribute to address the global water crises and meet the water-related targets defined by the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 55, no 8, p. 6327-6355
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396553DOI: 10.1029/2018WR023901ISI: 000490973700001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-396553DiVA, id: diva2:1368538
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 771678Available from: 2019-11-07 Created: 2019-11-07 Last updated: 2019-11-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(4114 kB)13 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 4114 kBChecksum SHA-512
68625a9ad58a7829ce2d3180c6a930159a8c17bd6af0bea0b9409452b2f9aec5c3c745bab0d918ba2313fbcae114b72701fde61fce4e8134192e4c81b6f1bac2
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Di Baldassarre, GiulianoSivapalan, MurugesuRusca, MariaKreibich, HeidiMondino, ElenaMård, Johanna
By organisation
LUVAL
In the same journal
Water resources research
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 13 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 6 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf