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Controls on Dissolved Organic Carbon Bioreactivity in River Systems
Lund Univ, Sweden.
Univ Montreal, Canada.
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Inst, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 14897Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inland waters transport, transform and retain significant amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that may be biologically reactive (bioreactive) and thus potentially degraded into atmospheric CO2. Despite its global importance, relatively little is known about environmental controls on bioreactivity of DOC as it moves through river systems with varying water residence time (WRT). Here we determined the influence ofWRT and landscape properties on DOC bioreactivity in 15 Swedish catchments spanning a large geographical and environmental gradient. We found that the short-term bioreactive pools (0-6 d of decay experiments) were linked to high aquatic primary productivity that, in turn, was stimulated by phosphorus loading from forested, agricultural and urban areas. Unexpectedly, the percentage of long-term bioreactive DOC (determined in 1-year experiments) increased with WRT, possibly due to photo-transformation of recalcitrant DOC from terrestrial sources into long-term bioreactive DOC with relatively lower aromaticity. Thus, despite overall decreases in DOC during water transit through the inland water continuum, DOC becomes relatively more bioreactive on a long time-scale. This increase in DOC bioreactivity with increasing WRT along the freshwater continuum has previously been overlooked. Further studies are needed to explain the processes and mechanisms behind this pattern on a molecular level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP , 2019. Vol. 9, article id 14897
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161383DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-50552-yISI: 000490702200012PubMedID: 31624278OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-161383DiVA, id: diva2:1367507
Note

Funding Agencies|Crafoord Foundation [20130613]; FORMASSwedish Research Council Formas [239-2014-698]

Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-12-13

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