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Familiar Places: A History of Place Attachment in a South Sami Community
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). (Arcum)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9380-0821
2019 (English)In: Genealogy, ISSN 2313-5778, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 1-18, article id 54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In contrast to situations in most other countries, Indigenous land rights in Sweden are tied to a specific livelihood—reindeer husbandry. Consequently, Sami culture is intimately connected to it. Currently, Sami who are not involved in reindeer husbandry use genealogy and attachment to place to signal Sami belonging and claim Sami identity. This paper explores the relationship between Sami genealogy and attachment to place before the reindeer grazing laws of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I show that within local Sami communities the land representing home was part of family history and identity while using historical archive material, narratives, and storytelling. State projects in the late 19th century challenged the links between family and land by confining Sami land title to reindeer husbandry, thereby constructing a notion of Sami as reindeer herders. The idea has restricted families and individuals from developing their culture and livelihoods as Sami. The construct continues to cause conflicts between Sami and between Sami and other members of local communities. Nevertheless, Sami today continue to evoke their connections to kinship and place, regardless of livelihood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 3, no 4, p. 1-18, article id 54
Keywords [en]
Sápmi, kinship, place, taxation lands
National Category
History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164230DOI: 10.3390/genealogy3040054OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-164230DiVA, id: diva2:1361959
Available from: 2019-10-17 Created: 2019-10-17 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved

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Brännlund, Isabelle
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