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Characterization of canine anti-mouse antibodies highlights that multiple strategies are needed to combat immunoassay interference
Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, 750 07, Sweden. .
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3161-0402
Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, 750 07, Sweden. .
Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, 750 07, Sweden. .
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 14521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immunoassays are widely used for detection and quantification of analytes in biological samples, but are vulnerable to analytical errors caused by interfering sample substances. Of particular interest are endogenous anti-animal antibodies that may bind to the immunoassay antibodies and cause erroneous test results. This phenomenon is a hazard to patient safety in both human and veterinary medicine. Here, we demonstrate that anti-mouse antibodies in dogs bind selectively to different regions of the murine IgG molecule, cross-react with IgG from different species, and consist of all major antibody classes present in canine serum (IgA, IgG and IgM). The antibody characteristics varied among individuals and their prevalence differed between two dog breeds. The selective binding to different IgG regions suggests that the antibodies might not originate from immunization through exposure to mice or other species. These findings show that canine anti-mouse antibodies are highly heterogeneous in nature and therefore require a combination of strategies to be counteracted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 9, no 1, article id 14521
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Clinical Science
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395066DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-51228-3ISI: 000489555200033PubMedID: 31601945OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-395066DiVA, id: diva2:1360364
Available from: 2019-10-12 Created: 2019-10-12 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved

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