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Antihypertensive treatmentin elderly and risk of falls: a systematic review
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Introduction The consequences of falling can be fatal to elderly. The mortality, morbidity and the risk ofanxiety and depression increases following a fall. Drug prescription is a preventable fall risk,making the association between antihypertensive medications and risk of falling an importantarea of investigation. Aim Compile the results from studies which have examined the effect of initiating or changing theantihypertensive medication on fall risk in people aged 60 years or older.

Methods Data sources: MEDLINE and Cochrane databases. Study selection: Original articles ofcohort-, case control-, case crossover-, cross-sectional- and randomized controlled trial type,published between January 2000 and May 2019 and written in English were included. Dataassessment: 6 studies met the criteria and were included. Study quality was assessed for eachstudy.

Results Three studies found significant short-term increase in fall risk, regardless of drug type. Onestudy discovered an 18% increase in fall risk for every 5-day gap in treatment. Two studiesevaluated antihypertensive drug types separately and found contradictive results of thiazidediuretics on short-term fall risk. Calcium channel blockers showed a protective effect andbeta blockers an increased risk during the first 3 weeks after initiating treatment.

Conclusions No consistent consensus was seen regarding the short-term fall risk in separateantihypertensive drug types, though most studies agree in a short-term risk increase aftergeneral antihypertensive treatment initiation or change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
Accidental Falls, Antihypertensive Agents, Elderly, Fall Risk, Fractures
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-77061OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-77061DiVA, id: diva2:1358296
Subject / course
Medicine
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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