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Remembrance of Things Past: Long-Term B Cell Memory After Infection and Vaccination
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Univ Chicago, Dept Med, Sect Rheumatol, 5841 S Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2651-3109
Univ Chicago, Dept Med, Sect Rheumatol, 5841 S Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 10, article id 1787Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The success of vaccines is dependent on the generation and maintenance of immunological memory. The immune system can remember previously encountered pathogens, and memory B and T cells are critical in secondary responses to infection. Studies in mice have helped to understand how different memory B cell populations are generated following antigen exposure and how affinity for the antigen is determinant to B cell fate. Additionally, such studies were fundamental in de fining memory B cell niches and how B cells respond following subsequent exposure with the same antigen. On the other hand, human studies are essential to the development of better, newer vaccines but sometimes limited by the difficulty to access primary and secondary lymphoid organs. However, work using human influenza and HIV virus infection and/or immunization in particular has significantly advanced today's understanding of memory B cells. This review will focus on the generation, function, and longevity of B-cell mediated immunological memory (memory B cells and plasma cells) in response to infection and vaccination both in mice and in humans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019. Vol. 10, article id 1787
Keywords [en]
B cell memory, vaccination, mouse vs. human, influenza virus, infection
National Category
Immunology in the medical area Immunology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391429DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2019.01787ISI: 000477994700001PubMedID: 31417562OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-391429DiVA, id: diva2:1357375
Available from: 2019-10-03 Created: 2019-10-03 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved

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