Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Urban form and sustainability: Comparison between low-rise “garden cities” and  high-rise “compact cities” of suburban areas
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Urbanization and climate change are two of the most important issues of our days. Many attempts have been made to define the most sustainable way to organise cities in order to cope with the increased population, while simultaneously being climate friendly, socially acceptable and economically viable. This master thesis focuses on the comparison of the sustainability performance of two particular theoretically planned urban forms, located in the suburban area of Stockholm – a “compact city”-like neighborhood and a “garden-city”-like neighbourhood. It was decided that the focus would be on the carbon footprint of the representative residences of each urban form, with the help of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); and that overall sustainability criteria for neighbourhoods would after wards be assessed, having a certification system forsustainable neighbourhoods (CityLab for districts, in particular) as a framework for a – mostly theoreticalassessment. After the exploring of the differences in the sustainability performance(environmental and social) of the two assessed urban forms, a discussion is made concerning the relationship between urban form and sustainability and conditions under which the most sustainable urban form could be achieved. The results of the analysis highlight that the concept “one size fits all” cannot conform to urban planning decisions, since cities should be able to adjust to the needs of each generation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 108
Series
TRITA-ABE-MBT ; 19672
Keywords [en]
garden cities, compact cities, sustainability, density, life-cycle assessment, sustainability performance indicators
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-260495OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-260495DiVA, id: diva2:1355694
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(5570 kB)10 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 5570 kBChecksum SHA-512
a92b42d68e562b18c844a5150b560ae5d99ecd1bdad848bb85a08f0be7afa53d6d3239358ccdd57d4de65387b78b95e2e63bec8e9479fcb9f160b7acfd528d8f
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering
Engineering and Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 10 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 29 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf